Chemokines and chemokine receptors: Biology and clinical relevance in inflammation and AIDS

Massimo Locati, Philip M. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chemokines constitute a large family of chemotactic cytokines that act at G protein-coupled receptors to regulate diverse biological processes, including leukocyte trafficking, angiogenesis, hematopoiesis, and organogenesis. They are believed to be both beneficial in host defense against infectious agents and harmful in diseases marked by pathologic inflammation; however, actual clinical roles in these areas have not yet been established. Recently, unexpected ways have been discovered in which medically important pathogens, including HIV-1, exploit or subvert the chemokine system. These and other recent results suggest that targeting specific chemokines and chemokine receptors may have therapeutic utility in both inflammation and infectious disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-440
Number of pages16
JournalAnnual Review of Medicine
Volume50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Chemokine Receptors
Chemokines
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Inflammation
Biological Phenomena
Organogenesis
Hematopoiesis
Pathogens
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Communicable Diseases
HIV-1
Leukocytes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • CCR5
  • HIV
  • Inflammation
  • Leukocyte
  • Malaria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chemokines and chemokine receptors : Biology and clinical relevance in inflammation and AIDS. / Locati, Massimo; Murphy, Philip M.

In: Annual Review of Medicine, Vol. 50, 1999, p. 425-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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