Chemotherapy against cancer during pregnancy

A systematic review on neonatal outcomes

Susanna Esposito, Rossana Tenconi, Valentina Preti, Elena Groppali, Nicola Principi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The concomitant incidence of cancer and pregnancy has increased in recent years because of the increase in maternal age at the time of the 1st pregnancy. The diagnosis of cancer in a pregnant woman causes ethical and therapeutic problems for both the patient and the physician. The main aim of this paper is to describe the available evidence concerning the short-and longterm neonatal impact of chemotherapy given to pregnant women. Methods:The relevant publications in English were identified by a systematic review of MEDLINE and PubMed for the last 15 years. The search strategy included "cancer[Title/Abstract] OR tumor[Title/Abstract] AND pregnancy[Title/Abstract] OR pregnant[Title/Abstract] AND embryo[Title/Abstract] or fetus[Title/Abstract] or neonate[Title/Abstract] or newborn[Title/Abstract] or pediatric[Title/Abstract] or child[Title/Abstract] AND English[lang]." Results:An analysis of the literature showed that only the administration of chemotherapy during the embryonic stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of the pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low, and pregnancy termination is not required. Conclusion: Data regarding the final outcome of children who have received in utero chemotherapy seem reassuring. Only the administration in the embryonal stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low and pregnancy termination is not needed. Increased knowledge of how to minimize the risks of chemotherapy can reduce improper management including unnecessary termination of pregnancy, delayed maternal treatment, and iatrogenic preterm delivery.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere4899
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume95
Issue number38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Drug Therapy
Pregnancy
Neoplasms
Fetus
Pregnant Women
Newborn Infant
Maternal Age
PubMed
MEDLINE
Publications
Embryonic Structures
Mothers
Pediatrics
Physicians
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Children
  • Embryo
  • Fetus
  • Neonate
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chemotherapy against cancer during pregnancy : A systematic review on neonatal outcomes. / Esposito, Susanna; Tenconi, Rossana; Preti, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Principi, Nicola.

In: Medicine (United States), Vol. 95, No. 38, e4899, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Esposito, Susanna ; Tenconi, Rossana ; Preti, Valentina ; Groppali, Elena ; Principi, Nicola. / Chemotherapy against cancer during pregnancy : A systematic review on neonatal outcomes. In: Medicine (United States). 2016 ; Vol. 95, No. 38.
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abstract = "Background: The concomitant incidence of cancer and pregnancy has increased in recent years because of the increase in maternal age at the time of the 1st pregnancy. The diagnosis of cancer in a pregnant woman causes ethical and therapeutic problems for both the patient and the physician. The main aim of this paper is to describe the available evidence concerning the short-and longterm neonatal impact of chemotherapy given to pregnant women. Methods:The relevant publications in English were identified by a systematic review of MEDLINE and PubMed for the last 15 years. The search strategy included {"}cancer[Title/Abstract] OR tumor[Title/Abstract] AND pregnancy[Title/Abstract] OR pregnant[Title/Abstract] AND embryo[Title/Abstract] or fetus[Title/Abstract] or neonate[Title/Abstract] or newborn[Title/Abstract] or pediatric[Title/Abstract] or child[Title/Abstract] AND English[lang].{"} Results:An analysis of the literature showed that only the administration of chemotherapy during the embryonic stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of the pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low, and pregnancy termination is not required. Conclusion: Data regarding the final outcome of children who have received in utero chemotherapy seem reassuring. Only the administration in the embryonal stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low and pregnancy termination is not needed. Increased knowledge of how to minimize the risks of chemotherapy can reduce improper management including unnecessary termination of pregnancy, delayed maternal treatment, and iatrogenic preterm delivery.",
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T2 - A systematic review on neonatal outcomes

AU - Esposito, Susanna

AU - Tenconi, Rossana

AU - Preti, Valentina

AU - Groppali, Elena

AU - Principi, Nicola

PY - 2016

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N2 - Background: The concomitant incidence of cancer and pregnancy has increased in recent years because of the increase in maternal age at the time of the 1st pregnancy. The diagnosis of cancer in a pregnant woman causes ethical and therapeutic problems for both the patient and the physician. The main aim of this paper is to describe the available evidence concerning the short-and longterm neonatal impact of chemotherapy given to pregnant women. Methods:The relevant publications in English were identified by a systematic review of MEDLINE and PubMed for the last 15 years. The search strategy included "cancer[Title/Abstract] OR tumor[Title/Abstract] AND pregnancy[Title/Abstract] OR pregnant[Title/Abstract] AND embryo[Title/Abstract] or fetus[Title/Abstract] or neonate[Title/Abstract] or newborn[Title/Abstract] or pediatric[Title/Abstract] or child[Title/Abstract] AND English[lang]." Results:An analysis of the literature showed that only the administration of chemotherapy during the embryonic stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of the pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low, and pregnancy termination is not required. Conclusion: Data regarding the final outcome of children who have received in utero chemotherapy seem reassuring. Only the administration in the embryonal stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low and pregnancy termination is not needed. Increased knowledge of how to minimize the risks of chemotherapy can reduce improper management including unnecessary termination of pregnancy, delayed maternal treatment, and iatrogenic preterm delivery.

AB - Background: The concomitant incidence of cancer and pregnancy has increased in recent years because of the increase in maternal age at the time of the 1st pregnancy. The diagnosis of cancer in a pregnant woman causes ethical and therapeutic problems for both the patient and the physician. The main aim of this paper is to describe the available evidence concerning the short-and longterm neonatal impact of chemotherapy given to pregnant women. Methods:The relevant publications in English were identified by a systematic review of MEDLINE and PubMed for the last 15 years. The search strategy included "cancer[Title/Abstract] OR tumor[Title/Abstract] AND pregnancy[Title/Abstract] OR pregnant[Title/Abstract] AND embryo[Title/Abstract] or fetus[Title/Abstract] or neonate[Title/Abstract] or newborn[Title/Abstract] or pediatric[Title/Abstract] or child[Title/Abstract] AND English[lang]." Results:An analysis of the literature showed that only the administration of chemotherapy during the embryonic stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of the pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low, and pregnancy termination is not required. Conclusion: Data regarding the final outcome of children who have received in utero chemotherapy seem reassuring. Only the administration in the embryonal stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low and pregnancy termination is not needed. Increased knowledge of how to minimize the risks of chemotherapy can reduce improper management including unnecessary termination of pregnancy, delayed maternal treatment, and iatrogenic preterm delivery.

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KW - Children

KW - Embryo

KW - Fetus

KW - Neonate

KW - Pregnancy

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