Cholesterol gallstone disease

Piero Portincasa, Antonio Moschetta, Giuseppe Palasciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

353 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With a prevalence of 10-15% in adults in Europe and the USA, gallstones are the most common digestive disease needing admission to hospital in the West. The interplay between interprandial and postprandial physiological responses to endogenous and dietary lipids underscores the importance of coordinated hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal functions to prevent crystallisation and precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol. Indeed, identifying the metabolic and transcriptional pathways that drive the regulation of biliary lipid secretion has been a major achievement in the field. We highlight scientific advances in protein and gene regulation of cholesterol absorption, synthesis, and catabolism, and biliary lipid secretion with respect to the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease. We discuss the physical-chemical mechanisms of gallstone formation in bile and the active role of the gallbladder and the intestine. We also discuss gaps in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of gallstone formation and the potential for gene targeting in therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)230-239
Number of pages10
JournalLancet
Volume368
Issue number9531
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2006

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Gallstones
Cholesterol
Lipids
Gene Targeting
Crystallization
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Gallbladder
Bile
Intestines
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Portincasa, P., Moschetta, A., & Palasciano, G. (2006). Cholesterol gallstone disease. Lancet, 368(9531), 230-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69044-2

Cholesterol gallstone disease. / Portincasa, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Palasciano, Giuseppe.

In: Lancet, Vol. 368, No. 9531, 15.07.2006, p. 230-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Portincasa, P, Moschetta, A & Palasciano, G 2006, 'Cholesterol gallstone disease', Lancet, vol. 368, no. 9531, pp. 230-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69044-2
Portincasa P, Moschetta A, Palasciano G. Cholesterol gallstone disease. Lancet. 2006 Jul 15;368(9531):230-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69044-2
Portincasa, Piero ; Moschetta, Antonio ; Palasciano, Giuseppe. / Cholesterol gallstone disease. In: Lancet. 2006 ; Vol. 368, No. 9531. pp. 230-239.
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