Chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients compared for characterization of human hemoglobin variants

R. Paleari, C. Arcelloni, R. Paroni, I. Fermo, A. Mosca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the performance of two highly resolving methods, chromatofocusing (CRF) and isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients (IPGF), for the separation of human hemoglobin variants. Lysates containing 13 different hemoglobins, including variants of clinical and geographical importance, and four electrophoretically 'silent' variants (Hb Brockton, Hb Cheverly, Hb Koln, and Hb Waco) were analyzed. Both techniques showed a good intrarun precision (CV = 0.87% for CRF, 0.27% for IPGF) and high and similar resolving power (0.010 pH units, with the pH gradients used in this work). The use of an ultranarrow IPGF range (pH 7.15-7.35; pH gradient = 0.019 pH/cm) allowed the resolution between Hb Brockton, Hb Koln, and Hb A. In some cases (Hb D-los Angeles, Hb F, Hb Waco), the variants were separated from Hb A different orders, depending on which technique was used, probably because of the different analytical principles of the two methods. As a second-level test, both procedures are informative for characterization of human hemoglobin variants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-430
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume35
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1989

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Proton-Motive Force
Isoelectric Focusing
Hemoglobins
Optical resolving power
hemoglobin Athens-Georgia
hemoglobin Koln
hemoglobin Brockton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients compared for characterization of human hemoglobin variants. / Paleari, R.; Arcelloni, C.; Paroni, R.; Fermo, I.; Mosca, A.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 35, No. 3, 1989, p. 425-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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