Chronic stress induces strain-dependent sensitization to the behavioral effects of amphetamine in the mouse

Aldo Badiani, Simona Cabib, Stefano Puglisi-Allegra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Following 10 days of daily restraint stress, sensitization developed to the stimulatory effect of amphetamine on locomotion in DBA/2 but not in C57BL/6 mice tested 24 h after the last stressful experience regardless of their being naive or habituated to the test cages. Saline-injected C57BL/6 mice, however, showed an increase of locomotion 24 h after chronic stress treatment. Chronically stressed mice of the two strains did not exhibit any alteration of dopamine and metabolites (3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-methoxytyramine) levels in the frontal cortex, caudatus putamen, or nucleus accumbens septi, thus ruling out that stress-induced alteration of basal dopamine metabolism affected the behavioral response to amphetamine challenging in DBA/2 mice. Ten daily amphetamine injections (5 mg/kg) did not significantly modify the behavioral response to amphetamine in either strain of mice tested 24 h after the end of the chronic treatment and did not increase locomotion in saline-injected C57BL/6 mice. Finally, chronically stressed hybrids B6D2F1 did not show sensitization to the locomotor effects of amphetamine, suggesting a dominant mode of inheritance in the response to chronic stress of the C57BL/6 strain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Keywords

  • Dopamine autoreceptors
  • Dopamine metabolism
  • Genotype
  • Locomotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology

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