Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein

Rona Wilson, Chris Plinston, Nora Hunter, Cristina Casalone, Cristiano Corona, Fabrizio Tagliavini, Silvia Suardi, Margherita Ruggerone, Fabio Moda, Silvia Graziano, Marco Sbriccoli, Franco Cardone, Maurizio Pocchiari, Loredana Ingrosso, Thierry Baron, Juergen Richt, Olivier Andreoletti, Marion Simmons, Richard Lockey, Jean C. MansonRona M. Barron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1624-1629
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume93
Issue numberPART 7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this