Cingulate cortex anatomical abnormalities in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder

Simerjit Kaur, Roberto B. Sassi, David Axelson, Mark Nicoletti, Paolo Brambilla, E. Serap Monkul, John P. Hatch, Matcheri S. Keshavan, Neal Ryan, Boris Birmaher, Jair C. Soares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: In vivo imaging studies have suggested anatomical and functional abnormalities in the anterior cingulate in adults with mood disorders. This anatomical magnetic resonance imaging study examined the cingulate cortex in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder and matched healthy comparison subjects. Method: Sixteen patients (mean age= 15.5 years, SD=3.4) with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects (mean age=16.9 years, SD=3.8) were studied. Three-dimensional gradient echo imaging was performed (TR=25 msec, TE=5 msec, slice thickness= 1.5 mm) in a 1.5-T GE Signa magnet. Cingulate volumes were compared by using analysis of covariance, with age and intracranial volume as covariates. Results: The patients with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller mean volumes relative to the healthy subjects in the left anterior cingulate (mean=2.49 cm3 [SD=0.28] versus 3.60 cm3 [SD=0.12], respectively), left posterior cingulate (2.53 cm 3 [SD=0.32] versus 2.89 cm3 [SD= 0.09]), and right posterior cingulate (2.19 cm3 [SD=0.13] versus 2.28 cm3 [SD= 0.08]). No significant between-group difference was found for the right anterior cingulate (2.64 cm3 [SD=0.21] versus 2.71 cm3 [SD=0.10]). Conclusions: The findings indicate smaller cingulate volumes in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, suggesting that such abnormalities may be present early in the illness course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1637-1643
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume162
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

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Gyrus Cinguli
Bipolar Disorder
Healthy Volunteers
Magnets
Mood Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cingulate cortex anatomical abnormalities in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. / Kaur, Simerjit; Sassi, Roberto B.; Axelson, David; Nicoletti, Mark; Brambilla, Paolo; Monkul, E. Serap; Hatch, John P.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Ryan, Neal; Birmaher, Boris; Soares, Jair C.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 162, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 1637-1643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaur, S, Sassi, RB, Axelson, D, Nicoletti, M, Brambilla, P, Monkul, ES, Hatch, JP, Keshavan, MS, Ryan, N, Birmaher, B & Soares, JC 2005, 'Cingulate cortex anatomical abnormalities in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 162, no. 9, pp. 1637-1643. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.162.9.1637
Kaur, Simerjit ; Sassi, Roberto B. ; Axelson, David ; Nicoletti, Mark ; Brambilla, Paolo ; Monkul, E. Serap ; Hatch, John P. ; Keshavan, Matcheri S. ; Ryan, Neal ; Birmaher, Boris ; Soares, Jair C. / Cingulate cortex anatomical abnormalities in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2005 ; Vol. 162, No. 9. pp. 1637-1643.
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AU - Kaur, Simerjit

AU - Sassi, Roberto B.

AU - Axelson, David

AU - Nicoletti, Mark

AU - Brambilla, Paolo

AU - Monkul, E. Serap

AU - Hatch, John P.

AU - Keshavan, Matcheri S.

AU - Ryan, Neal

AU - Birmaher, Boris

AU - Soares, Jair C.

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N2 - Objective: In vivo imaging studies have suggested anatomical and functional abnormalities in the anterior cingulate in adults with mood disorders. This anatomical magnetic resonance imaging study examined the cingulate cortex in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder and matched healthy comparison subjects. Method: Sixteen patients (mean age= 15.5 years, SD=3.4) with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects (mean age=16.9 years, SD=3.8) were studied. Three-dimensional gradient echo imaging was performed (TR=25 msec, TE=5 msec, slice thickness= 1.5 mm) in a 1.5-T GE Signa magnet. Cingulate volumes were compared by using analysis of covariance, with age and intracranial volume as covariates. Results: The patients with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller mean volumes relative to the healthy subjects in the left anterior cingulate (mean=2.49 cm3 [SD=0.28] versus 3.60 cm3 [SD=0.12], respectively), left posterior cingulate (2.53 cm 3 [SD=0.32] versus 2.89 cm3 [SD= 0.09]), and right posterior cingulate (2.19 cm3 [SD=0.13] versus 2.28 cm3 [SD= 0.08]). No significant between-group difference was found for the right anterior cingulate (2.64 cm3 [SD=0.21] versus 2.71 cm3 [SD=0.10]). Conclusions: The findings indicate smaller cingulate volumes in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, suggesting that such abnormalities may be present early in the illness course.

AB - Objective: In vivo imaging studies have suggested anatomical and functional abnormalities in the anterior cingulate in adults with mood disorders. This anatomical magnetic resonance imaging study examined the cingulate cortex in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder and matched healthy comparison subjects. Method: Sixteen patients (mean age= 15.5 years, SD=3.4) with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects (mean age=16.9 years, SD=3.8) were studied. Three-dimensional gradient echo imaging was performed (TR=25 msec, TE=5 msec, slice thickness= 1.5 mm) in a 1.5-T GE Signa magnet. Cingulate volumes were compared by using analysis of covariance, with age and intracranial volume as covariates. Results: The patients with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller mean volumes relative to the healthy subjects in the left anterior cingulate (mean=2.49 cm3 [SD=0.28] versus 3.60 cm3 [SD=0.12], respectively), left posterior cingulate (2.53 cm 3 [SD=0.32] versus 2.89 cm3 [SD= 0.09]), and right posterior cingulate (2.19 cm3 [SD=0.13] versus 2.28 cm3 [SD= 0.08]). No significant between-group difference was found for the right anterior cingulate (2.64 cm3 [SD=0.21] versus 2.71 cm3 [SD=0.10]). Conclusions: The findings indicate smaller cingulate volumes in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, suggesting that such abnormalities may be present early in the illness course.

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