Circadian and hypothermia-induced effects on visual and auditory evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis

A. Romani, R. Bergamaschi, M. Versino, A. Zilioli, R. Callieco, V. Cosi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Body cooling has been proposed as a symptomatic treatment for multiple sclerosis. This study aimed to assess the effects of body cooling and of circadian variations on clinical parameters and on visual and auditory evoked potential measures in multiple sclerosis patients. Methods: Clinical status was assessed and VEPs, BAEPs and MLAEPs (all with two stimulus frequencies) were recorded a total of 4 times on two separate days (two times per day at 08:30 and 15:00 h each day) in 10 multiple sclerosis patients and 10 controls. On one of these days, the subjects were submitted to body cooling before the afternoon session. Results: Tympanic temperature was significantly higher in the afternoon. Cooling lowered the temperature by 1.4°C. No clinical effects were observed. Circadian effects were detected on VEP amplitude, which increased both in controls and in patients at low stimulus frequency (P <0.01), and increased in controls and decreased in patients at high stimulus frequency (interaction: P <0.01). Cooling determined an increase in BAEP I-V peak-to-peak time in controls, and a reduction in patients at high stimulus frequency (interaction: P <0.01). In patients, cooling also determined a great increase in MLAEP amplitude (interaction: P <0.001). We did not find cooling effects on VEP measures. Conclusions: Visual and auditory evoked potentials showed differences in circadian and cooling effects between controls and multiple sclerosis patients. These differences are consistent with the hypothesis of temperature-dependent conduction blocks in demyelinated fibers. Cooling may have a clinical effect in selected patients only. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1602-1606
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume111
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2000

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Induced Hypothermia
Auditory Evoked Potentials
Visual Evoked Potentials
Multiple Sclerosis
Temperature

Keywords

  • Circadian and hypothermia-induced effects
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Visual and auditory evoked potentials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Circadian and hypothermia-induced effects on visual and auditory evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis. / Romani, A.; Bergamaschi, R.; Versino, M.; Zilioli, A.; Callieco, R.; Cosi, V.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 111, No. 9, 01.09.2000, p. 1602-1606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romani, A. ; Bergamaschi, R. ; Versino, M. ; Zilioli, A. ; Callieco, R. ; Cosi, V. / Circadian and hypothermia-induced effects on visual and auditory evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2000 ; Vol. 111, No. 9. pp. 1602-1606.
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