Circadian melatonin and young-to-old pineal grafting postpone aging and maintain juvenile conditions of reproductive functions in mice and rats

Walter Pierpaoli, D. Bulian, A. Dall'ara, B. Marchetti, F. Gallo, M. C. Morale, C. Tirolo, N. Testa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic, night administration of melatonin to aging mice and transplantation of a young pineal gland into the thymic rudiment of older mice and rats have been studied with the aim of evaluating their effects on aging of gonadal, sexual, and reproductive functions. Both melatonin administration and young-to-old pineal grafting positively affect size and function of testes and maintenance of juvenile hippocampal and testicular LHRH-receptors and β-adrenergic receptors in the testes of old rats and mice. These results demonstrate that a pineal-directed circadian function and cyclicity is fundamental for the regulation of sexual reproductive physiology, and that proper intervention with melatonin may potentially postpone aging of both neural and gonadal sexual function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-602
Number of pages16
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume32
Issue number4-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1997

Keywords

  • β-adrenergic receptors
  • Brain LHRH receptors
  • Gonads
  • Melatonin
  • Pineal gland
  • Reproductive hormones
  • Sexual aging
  • Testes
  • Testosterone
  • Thymus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Medicine(all)

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