Circadian rhythm in rest and activity: A biological correlate of quality of life and a predictor of survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Pasquale F. Innominato, Christian Focan, Thierry Gorlia, Thierry Moreau, Carlo Garufi, Jim Waterhouse, Sylvie Giacchetti, Bruno Coudert, Stefano Iacobelli, Dominique Genet, Marco Tampellini, Philippe Chollet, Marie Ange Lentz, Marie Christine Mormont, Francis Lévi, Georg A. Bjarnason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The rest-activity circadian rhythm (CircAct) reflects the function of the circadian timing system. In a prior single-institution study, the extent of CircAct perturbation independently predicted for survival and tumor response in 192 patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Moreover, the main CircAct parameters correlated with several health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scales. In this prospective study, we attempted to extend these results to an independent cohort of chemotherapy-naive metastatic colorectal cancer patients participating in an international randomized phase III trial (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 05963). Patients were randomized to receive chronomodulated or conventional infusion of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients from nine institutions completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and wore a wrist accelerometer (actigraph) for 3 days before chemotherapy delivery. Two validated parameters (I |0.25|; P <0.01). I

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4700-4707
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume69
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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