Circadian variation in the occurrences of ventricular tachyarrhythmias: Differences between coronary artery disease and dilated cardiomyopathy

A. Casaleggio, P. Rossi, V. Malavasi, G. Musso, L. Oltrona

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Aim: This study investigates circadian distribution of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in coronary artery disease (CAD) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients that received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as secondary prevention. Methods: 37 patients are studied. Times of VT episode are retrieved from data log of the ICD; the analysis includes the separation of different modes of VT-onset. Circadian distributions are fitted using harmonics and polynomial regression models; Goodness of fit is estimated using the coefficient of determination R2. Results: 165 VT episodes are recorded from 37 patients: 79 are collected from 26 CAD and 86 from 11 DCM patients. Fitting of the circadian distribution of CAD population gives RR2=0.854 with harmonic and R2=0.767 with polynomial model. Similarly with DCM patients, fitting with polynomial model led to RR2=0.997 while harmonic regression led to RR2=0.983. Different modes of VT onset show strongly different circadian patterns even when patients have the same etiology. Conclusion: Circadian distribution of VT episodes from CAD and DCM patients are intrinsically different.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputers in Cardiology
Pages415-418
Number of pages4
Volume34
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventComputers in Cardiology 2007, CAR 2007 - Durham, NC, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2007Oct 3 2007

Other

OtherComputers in Cardiology 2007, CAR 2007
CountryUnited States
CityDurham, NC
Period9/30/0710/3/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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