Cisplatin and weekly docetaxel as first-line therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer a phase II study

Alfredo Tartarone, Gianpiero Romano, Giovanni Iodice, Alba Capobianco, Mariarosa Coccaro, Annamaria Bochicchio, Pasquale Di Leo, Raffaele Ardito, Nicola Di Renzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Based on the results of previous phase I studies, in the current phase II trial we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus weekly docetaxel in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: The eligibility criteria for the study included newly diagnosed stage IIIB/IV NSCLC, age ≤75 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2, adequate organ functions, and signed informed consent. The chemotherapy regimen consisted of cisplatin, 80 mg/m 2 on day 1, and docetaxel, 25 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks. Results: Between January 2002 and December 2003, 31 patients with NSCLC were enrolled in the study. An objective response rate of 40% (95% CI, 21-60) was obtained in 27 assessable patients. The median time to progression was 6.4 months (range, 2.5-26.3) and median overall survival was 10.01 months (range, 5-28.3). The regimen was well tolerated with no grade 4 toxicity. Conclusions: Cisplatin plus weekly docetaxel is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in chemo-naive patients with advanced NSCLC. A phase III study of weekly versus the conventional regimen of every three weeks should be conducted to compare the survival benefits, toxicity profile and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-134
Number of pages4
JournalTumori
Volume91
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Cisplatin
  • Docetaxel
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Weekly administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cisplatin and weekly docetaxel as first-line therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer a phase II study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this