Climate changes and ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty

Francesco Versaci, Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai, Angela Dei Giudici, Enrica Mariano, Antonio Trivisonno, Sebastiano Sciarretta, Valentina Valenti, Mariangela Peruzzi, Elena Cavarretta, Giacomo Frati, Massimiliano Scappaticci, Massimo Federici, Francesco Romeo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The impact of seasonal changes on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been incompletely appraised, especially in the modern era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We aimed to appraise the overall and season-specific impact of climate changes on the daily rate of PCCI.

METHODS: Details on PPCI and climate changes were retrospectively collected in three high-volume Italian institutions with different geographical features. The association between rate of PPCI and temperature, atmospheric pressure (ATM), humidity and rainfall was appraised with Poisson models, with overall analyses and according to season of the year.

RESULTS: Details on 6880 days with a total of 4132 PPCI were collected. Overall adjusted analysis showed that higher minimum atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with lower risk (regression coefficient = 0.999 [95% confidence interval 0.998-1.000], p = 0.030). Focusing on season, in Winter PPCI rates were increased by lower same day mean temperature (0.973 [0.956-0.990], p = 0.002) and lower rainfall (0.980 [0.960-1.000], p = 0.049). Conversely, in Spring greater changes in atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with increased risk (1.023 [1.002-1.045], p = 0.032), with similar effects in Summer for minimum temperature on the same day (1.022 [1.001-1.044], p = 0.040).

CONCLUSIONS: Climate has a significant impact on the risk of PPCI in the current era, with a complex interplay according to season. Higher risk risk is expected with lower minimum atmospheric pressure in the preceding days, lower rainfall in Winter, greater changes in atmospheric pressure in Spring, and higher temperatures in Summer. These findings have important implications for prevention strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume294
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

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Climate Change
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Angioplasty
Atmospheric Pressure
Temperature
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction
Humidity
Climate
Myocardial Infarction
Confidence Intervals
Incidence

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Climate changes and ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty. / Versaci, Francesco; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Giudici, Angela Dei; Mariano, Enrica; Trivisonno, Antonio; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Valenti, Valentina; Peruzzi, Mariangela; Cavarretta, Elena; Frati, Giacomo; Scappaticci, Massimiliano; Federici, Massimo; Romeo, Francesco.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 294, 01.11.2019, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Versaci, F, Biondi-Zoccai, G, Giudici, AD, Mariano, E, Trivisonno, A, Sciarretta, S, Valenti, V, Peruzzi, M, Cavarretta, E, Frati, G, Scappaticci, M, Federici, M & Romeo, F 2019, 'Climate changes and ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty', International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 294, pp. 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.07.006
Versaci, Francesco ; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe ; Giudici, Angela Dei ; Mariano, Enrica ; Trivisonno, Antonio ; Sciarretta, Sebastiano ; Valenti, Valentina ; Peruzzi, Mariangela ; Cavarretta, Elena ; Frati, Giacomo ; Scappaticci, Massimiliano ; Federici, Massimo ; Romeo, Francesco. / Climate changes and ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2019 ; Vol. 294. pp. 1-5.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The impact of seasonal changes on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been incompletely appraised, especially in the modern era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We aimed to appraise the overall and season-specific impact of climate changes on the daily rate of PCCI.METHODS: Details on PPCI and climate changes were retrospectively collected in three high-volume Italian institutions with different geographical features. The association between rate of PPCI and temperature, atmospheric pressure (ATM), humidity and rainfall was appraised with Poisson models, with overall analyses and according to season of the year.RESULTS: Details on 6880 days with a total of 4132 PPCI were collected. Overall adjusted analysis showed that higher minimum atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with lower risk (regression coefficient = 0.999 [95{\%} confidence interval 0.998-1.000], p = 0.030). Focusing on season, in Winter PPCI rates were increased by lower same day mean temperature (0.973 [0.956-0.990], p = 0.002) and lower rainfall (0.980 [0.960-1.000], p = 0.049). Conversely, in Spring greater changes in atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with increased risk (1.023 [1.002-1.045], p = 0.032), with similar effects in Summer for minimum temperature on the same day (1.022 [1.001-1.044], p = 0.040).CONCLUSIONS: Climate has a significant impact on the risk of PPCI in the current era, with a complex interplay according to season. Higher risk risk is expected with lower minimum atmospheric pressure in the preceding days, lower rainfall in Winter, greater changes in atmospheric pressure in Spring, and higher temperatures in Summer. These findings have important implications for prevention strategies.",
author = "Francesco Versaci and Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai and Giudici, {Angela Dei} and Enrica Mariano and Antonio Trivisonno and Sebastiano Sciarretta and Valentina Valenti and Mariangela Peruzzi and Elena Cavarretta and Giacomo Frati and Massimiliano Scappaticci and Massimo Federici and Francesco Romeo",
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T1 - Climate changes and ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty

AU - Versaci, Francesco

AU - Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe

AU - Giudici, Angela Dei

AU - Mariano, Enrica

AU - Trivisonno, Antonio

AU - Sciarretta, Sebastiano

AU - Valenti, Valentina

AU - Peruzzi, Mariangela

AU - Cavarretta, Elena

AU - Frati, Giacomo

AU - Scappaticci, Massimiliano

AU - Federici, Massimo

AU - Romeo, Francesco

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: The impact of seasonal changes on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been incompletely appraised, especially in the modern era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We aimed to appraise the overall and season-specific impact of climate changes on the daily rate of PCCI.METHODS: Details on PPCI and climate changes were retrospectively collected in three high-volume Italian institutions with different geographical features. The association between rate of PPCI and temperature, atmospheric pressure (ATM), humidity and rainfall was appraised with Poisson models, with overall analyses and according to season of the year.RESULTS: Details on 6880 days with a total of 4132 PPCI were collected. Overall adjusted analysis showed that higher minimum atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with lower risk (regression coefficient = 0.999 [95% confidence interval 0.998-1.000], p = 0.030). Focusing on season, in Winter PPCI rates were increased by lower same day mean temperature (0.973 [0.956-0.990], p = 0.002) and lower rainfall (0.980 [0.960-1.000], p = 0.049). Conversely, in Spring greater changes in atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with increased risk (1.023 [1.002-1.045], p = 0.032), with similar effects in Summer for minimum temperature on the same day (1.022 [1.001-1.044], p = 0.040).CONCLUSIONS: Climate has a significant impact on the risk of PPCI in the current era, with a complex interplay according to season. Higher risk risk is expected with lower minimum atmospheric pressure in the preceding days, lower rainfall in Winter, greater changes in atmospheric pressure in Spring, and higher temperatures in Summer. These findings have important implications for prevention strategies.

AB - BACKGROUND: The impact of seasonal changes on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been incompletely appraised, especially in the modern era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We aimed to appraise the overall and season-specific impact of climate changes on the daily rate of PCCI.METHODS: Details on PPCI and climate changes were retrospectively collected in three high-volume Italian institutions with different geographical features. The association between rate of PPCI and temperature, atmospheric pressure (ATM), humidity and rainfall was appraised with Poisson models, with overall analyses and according to season of the year.RESULTS: Details on 6880 days with a total of 4132 PPCI were collected. Overall adjusted analysis showed that higher minimum atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with lower risk (regression coefficient = 0.999 [95% confidence interval 0.998-1.000], p = 0.030). Focusing on season, in Winter PPCI rates were increased by lower same day mean temperature (0.973 [0.956-0.990], p = 0.002) and lower rainfall (0.980 [0.960-1.000], p = 0.049). Conversely, in Spring greater changes in atmospheric pressure 3 days before PPCI were associated with increased risk (1.023 [1.002-1.045], p = 0.032), with similar effects in Summer for minimum temperature on the same day (1.022 [1.001-1.044], p = 0.040).CONCLUSIONS: Climate has a significant impact on the risk of PPCI in the current era, with a complex interplay according to season. Higher risk risk is expected with lower minimum atmospheric pressure in the preceding days, lower rainfall in Winter, greater changes in atmospheric pressure in Spring, and higher temperatures in Summer. These findings have important implications for prevention strategies.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.07.006

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.07.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 31301864

VL - 294

SP - 1

EP - 5

JO - International Journal of Cardiology

JF - International Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0167-5273

ER -