Clinical and prognostic significance of a reverse dipping pattern on ambulatory monitoring: An updated review

Cesare Cuspidi, Carla Sala, Marijana Tadic, Elisa Gherbesi, Antonio De Giorgi, Guido Grassi, Giuseppe Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Reverse or inverted dipping (ie, the phenomenon characterized by higher nighttime compared with daytime blood pressure values) is an alteration of circadian blood pressure rhythm frequently documented in hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and sleep apnea syndrome, and generally regarded as a harmful condition. Available literature on the clinical and prognostic implications of reverse dipping is scanty. The present article will review a number of relevant issues concerning reverse dipping, in particular: (1) its possible mechanisms; (2) prevalence and clinical correlates, (3) concomitant cardiac and extracardiac subclinical organ damage; (4) association with acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases; (5) prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular events and mortality; and (6) therapeutic interventions aimed at reverting this abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)713-721
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article
  • Review

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