Clinical correlation between motor evoked potentials and gait recovery in poststroke patients

Lamberto Piron, Franco Piccione, Paolo Tonin, Mauro Dam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate, in patients with a stroke in the area of the middle cerebral artery, whether transcranial magnetic stimulation values from the affected lower limb correlated with the degree of gait recovery. Design: The prognostic evaluation in subjects with complete lower-limb palsy, inability to walk, and dependence in the activities of daily living, 1 month after vascular injury. Setting: University-affiliated rehabilitation hospital. Participants: Twenty consecutive patients (12 women, 8 men) were enrolled 1 month poststroke (30±5d); all patients concluded the rehabilitation program, which lasted 6 months. Intervention: Barthel Index score, Hemiplegic Stroke Scale (HSS) score, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the tibialis anterior muscle were performed 1, 4, and 7 months poststroke. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient were employed. Main Outcome Measures: The independence of gait defined as an HSS gait score of 3 or less (ability to walk without assistance apart from a stick or cane). Results: Patients with no recordable MEPs 1 month poststroke never regained walking ability; patients with MEPs of 8% or more (13.11±5.95) regained independent gait at discharge. It was not possible to predict walking capacity in patients with MEPs less than 8% (4.0±1.41). Four months postinjury, walking capacity was achieved only by the patients with MEPs of 18% or more (23.1±6.2). Conclusions: In the postacute phase of stroke, the lower-limb MEP amplitudes could be a supportive tool for prognosis of lower-limb motor outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1874-1878
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume86
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Fingerprint

Motor Evoked Potentials
Gait
Lower Extremity
Nonparametric Statistics
Stroke
Walking
Rehabilitation
Canes
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Vascular System Injuries
Middle Cerebral Artery
Activities of Daily Living
Paralysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Muscles

Keywords

  • Evoked potentials, motor
  • Magnets
  • Motor activity
  • Rehabilitation
  • Stroke
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Clinical correlation between motor evoked potentials and gait recovery in poststroke patients. / Piron, Lamberto; Piccione, Franco; Tonin, Paolo; Dam, Mauro.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 86, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 1874-1878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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