Clinical evaluation of two different protein content formulas fed to full-term healthy infants

a randomized controlled trial

Nadia Liotto, Anna Orsi, Camilla Menis, Pasqua Piemontese, Laura Morlacchi, Chiara Cristiana Condello, Maria Lorella Giannì, Paola Roggero, Fabio Mosca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A high early protein intake is associated with rapid postnatal weight gain and altered body composition. We aimed to evaluate the safety of a low-protein formula in healthy full-term infants.

METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted. A total of 118 infants were randomized to receive two different protein content formulas (formula A or formula B (protein content: 1.2 vs. 1.7 g/100 mL, respectively)) for the first 4 months of life. Anthropometry and body composition by air displacement plethysmography were assessed at enrolment and at two and 4 months. The reference group comprised 50 healthy, exclusively breastfed, full-term infants.

RESULTS: Weight gain (g/day) throughout the study was similar between the formula groups (32.5 ± 6.1 vs. 32.8 ± 6.8) and in the reference group (30.4 ± 5.4). The formula groups showed similar body composition but a different fat-free mass content from breastfed infants at two and 4 months. However, the formula A group showed a fat-free mass increase more similar to that of the breastfed infants. The occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms or adverse events was similar between the formula groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Feeding a low-protein content formula appears to be safe and to promote adequate growth, although determination of the long-term effect on body composition requires further study.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The present study was retrospectively registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (trial number: NCT03035721 on January 18, 2017).

Original languageEnglish
Article number59
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 13 2018

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Body Composition
Randomized Controlled Trials
Proteins
Weight Gain
Fats
Anthropometry
Plethysmography
Air
Safety
Growth

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Full-term infants
  • Growth
  • Low-protein formula
  • Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Clinical evaluation of two different protein content formulas fed to full-term healthy infants : a randomized controlled trial. / Liotto, Nadia; Orsi, Anna; Menis, Camilla; Piemontese, Pasqua; Morlacchi, Laura; Condello, Chiara Cristiana; Giannì, Maria Lorella; Roggero, Paola; Mosca, Fabio.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 18, No. 1, 59, 13.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Condello, Chiara Cristiana

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