Clinical factors that affect walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion patients

Giorgio Scivoletto, Angela Romanelli, Andrea Mariotti, Daniele Marinucci, Federica Tamburella, Alessia Mammone, Elena Cosentino, Silvia Sterzi, Marco Molinari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN. Observational Study. OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effects of neurologic and non-neurologic factors on walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Walking is one of the primary goals of patients after a SCL. Several studies have demonstrated that different neurologic and non-neurologic factors can affect walking level and performance. However, in SCL age and muscle strength have always been considered the major determinants of walking. METHODS. Sixty-five patients with chronic SCL were included. Their demographic, neurologic status (ASIA standards), balance, and spasticity were recorded. Pearson and Spearman correlations were adopted to quantify the association between patients' characteristics and walking ability. The relationship between functional walking measures, Timed Up and Go, Six Minutes Walking Test (SMWT), Ten Meters Walking Test, and Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury, and demographic and neurologic factors were measured by regression analyses. RESULTS. Strength, balance, spasticity, and age were strictly correlated with walking level and walking performance. They also were the best predictors of walking features. CONCLUSION. Results confirm the recognized importance of age and upper and lower extremity strengths for walking after a SCL. They also highlight the role of 2 other factors, i.e., balance and spasticity, seldom considered as thoroughly in SCL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalSpine
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Walking
Spinal Cord
Nervous System
Demography
Muscle Strength
Spinal Cord Injuries
Observational Studies
Lower Extremity
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Age
  • Balance
  • Spasticity
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Strength
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Clinical factors that affect walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion patients. / Scivoletto, Giorgio; Romanelli, Angela; Mariotti, Andrea; Marinucci, Daniele; Tamburella, Federica; Mammone, Alessia; Cosentino, Elena; Sterzi, Silvia; Molinari, Marco.

In: Spine, Vol. 33, No. 3, 02.2008, p. 259-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scivoletto, Giorgio ; Romanelli, Angela ; Mariotti, Andrea ; Marinucci, Daniele ; Tamburella, Federica ; Mammone, Alessia ; Cosentino, Elena ; Sterzi, Silvia ; Molinari, Marco. / Clinical factors that affect walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion patients. In: Spine. 2008 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 259-264.
@article{84e5ed2898e14b0d824792e9f0c2cb0f,
title = "Clinical factors that affect walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion patients",
abstract = "STUDY DESIGN. Observational Study. OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effects of neurologic and non-neurologic factors on walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Walking is one of the primary goals of patients after a SCL. Several studies have demonstrated that different neurologic and non-neurologic factors can affect walking level and performance. However, in SCL age and muscle strength have always been considered the major determinants of walking. METHODS. Sixty-five patients with chronic SCL were included. Their demographic, neurologic status (ASIA standards), balance, and spasticity were recorded. Pearson and Spearman correlations were adopted to quantify the association between patients' characteristics and walking ability. The relationship between functional walking measures, Timed Up and Go, Six Minutes Walking Test (SMWT), Ten Meters Walking Test, and Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury, and demographic and neurologic factors were measured by regression analyses. RESULTS. Strength, balance, spasticity, and age were strictly correlated with walking level and walking performance. They also were the best predictors of walking features. CONCLUSION. Results confirm the recognized importance of age and upper and lower extremity strengths for walking after a SCL. They also highlight the role of 2 other factors, i.e., balance and spasticity, seldom considered as thoroughly in SCL.",
keywords = "Age, Balance, Spasticity, Spinal cord injury, Strength, Walking",
author = "Giorgio Scivoletto and Angela Romanelli and Andrea Mariotti and Daniele Marinucci and Federica Tamburella and Alessia Mammone and Elena Cosentino and Silvia Sterzi and Marco Molinari",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181626ab0",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "259--264",
journal = "Spine",
issn = "0362-2436",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical factors that affect walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion patients

AU - Scivoletto, Giorgio

AU - Romanelli, Angela

AU - Mariotti, Andrea

AU - Marinucci, Daniele

AU - Tamburella, Federica

AU - Mammone, Alessia

AU - Cosentino, Elena

AU - Sterzi, Silvia

AU - Molinari, Marco

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - STUDY DESIGN. Observational Study. OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effects of neurologic and non-neurologic factors on walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Walking is one of the primary goals of patients after a SCL. Several studies have demonstrated that different neurologic and non-neurologic factors can affect walking level and performance. However, in SCL age and muscle strength have always been considered the major determinants of walking. METHODS. Sixty-five patients with chronic SCL were included. Their demographic, neurologic status (ASIA standards), balance, and spasticity were recorded. Pearson and Spearman correlations were adopted to quantify the association between patients' characteristics and walking ability. The relationship between functional walking measures, Timed Up and Go, Six Minutes Walking Test (SMWT), Ten Meters Walking Test, and Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury, and demographic and neurologic factors were measured by regression analyses. RESULTS. Strength, balance, spasticity, and age were strictly correlated with walking level and walking performance. They also were the best predictors of walking features. CONCLUSION. Results confirm the recognized importance of age and upper and lower extremity strengths for walking after a SCL. They also highlight the role of 2 other factors, i.e., balance and spasticity, seldom considered as thoroughly in SCL.

AB - STUDY DESIGN. Observational Study. OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effects of neurologic and non-neurologic factors on walking level and performance in chronic spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Walking is one of the primary goals of patients after a SCL. Several studies have demonstrated that different neurologic and non-neurologic factors can affect walking level and performance. However, in SCL age and muscle strength have always been considered the major determinants of walking. METHODS. Sixty-five patients with chronic SCL were included. Their demographic, neurologic status (ASIA standards), balance, and spasticity were recorded. Pearson and Spearman correlations were adopted to quantify the association between patients' characteristics and walking ability. The relationship between functional walking measures, Timed Up and Go, Six Minutes Walking Test (SMWT), Ten Meters Walking Test, and Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury, and demographic and neurologic factors were measured by regression analyses. RESULTS. Strength, balance, spasticity, and age were strictly correlated with walking level and walking performance. They also were the best predictors of walking features. CONCLUSION. Results confirm the recognized importance of age and upper and lower extremity strengths for walking after a SCL. They also highlight the role of 2 other factors, i.e., balance and spasticity, seldom considered as thoroughly in SCL.

KW - Age

KW - Balance

KW - Spasticity

KW - Spinal cord injury

KW - Strength

KW - Walking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40049094201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=40049094201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181626ab0

DO - 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181626ab0

M3 - Article

C2 - 18303457

AN - SCOPUS:40049094201

VL - 33

SP - 259

EP - 264

JO - Spine

JF - Spine

SN - 0362-2436

IS - 3

ER -