Clinical management of atrial fibrillation: Early interventions, observation, and structured follow-up reduce hospitalizations

Alberto Conti, Erica Canuti, Yuri Mariannini, Gabriele Viviani, Claudio Poggioni, Vanessa Boni, Riccardo Pini, Simone Vanni, Luigi Padeletti, Gian Franco Gensini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Novel facilities such as an intensive observation unit and an outpatient clinic could result in improving management of patients presenting with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: This observational study enrolled 3475 patients. Group 1 (1120 patients; years 2004-2005) was managed with standard approach; group 2 (992 patients; years 2006-2007) was managed with additional intensive observation; group 3 (1363 patients; years 2008-2009) was managed with additional intensive observation and outpatient clinic. Primary end point was admission to hospital. Secondary end points included modalities of rhythm conversion and administration of class IC vs class III antiarrhythmic drugs in patients with AF lasting less than 48 hours. Results: Lack of rhythm control, comorbidities, diabetes, and age were independent predictors of hospitalization. Admissions significantly decreased from group 1 (50%) to 2 (38%) and to 3 (24%) (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1962-1969
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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