Clinical management of primary non-acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myeloid leukemia: Practice Guidelines by the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation

Enrica Morra, Giovanni Barosi, Alberto Bosi, Felicetto Ferrara, Franco Locatelli, Monia Marchetti, Giovanni Martinelli, Cristina Mecucci, Marco Vignetti, Sante Tura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As many options are now available to treat patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia, the Italian Society of Hematology and two affiliated societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned a project to an Expert Panel aimed at developing clinical practice guidelines for acute myeloid leukemia treatment. After a systematic comprehensive literature review, the Expert Panel formulated recommendations for the management of primary acute myeloid leukemia (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia) and graded them according to the supporting evidence. When evidence was lacking, consensus-based statements have been added. First-line therapy for all newly diagnosed patients eligible for intensive treatment should include one cycle of induction with standard dose cytarabine and an anthracycline. After achieving complete remission, patients aged less than 60 years should receive consolidation therapy including high-dose cytarabine. Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-compatible sibling should be performed in first complete remission: 1) in children with intermediate-high risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy; 2) in adults less than 40 years with an intermediate-risk; in those aged less than 55 years with either high-risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy. Stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor is recommended to be performed in first complete remission in adults 30 years old or younger, and in children with very high-risk disease lacking a sibling donor. Alternative donor stem cell transplantation is an option in high-risk patients without a matched donor who urgently need transplantation. Patients aged less than 60 years, who either are not candidate for allogeneic stem cell transplantation or lack a donor, are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an explicit approach to consensus techniques, which resulted in recommendations for the management of primary non-APL acute myeloid leukemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-112
Number of pages11
JournalHaematologica
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Clinical practice guidelines
  • Stem cell transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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