Clinical oncology in resource-limited settings

Franco M. Buonaguro, Serigne N. Gueye, Henry R. Wabinga, Twalib A. Ngoma, Jan B. Vermorken, Sam M. Mbulaiteye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infectious Agents and Cancer is introducing a new section of Clinical Oncology with the main objective of stimulating debate through articles published in the section. Infectious diseases have been the major causes of morbidity and mortality in human populations, and have dominated the medical approach to clinical and public health. Successful efforts to control mortality from acute infections have paved the way for chronic, mostly indolent, infections to become major causes of morbidity. Cancer, hitherto thought to be rare in resource-limited settings, is becoming a major contributor. The changes in mortality patterns are due, in part, to diseases linked to rapid changes in lifestyle, urbanization, and pollution. These diseases include many of the non-infection associated cancers. However, there is a dearth of information about the burden, pathogenesis, and therapeutic approaches about cancer in resource-limited countries. There are also substantial other challenges, including economic, infrastructure, technology, and personnel. The Journal advocates for interactive local-global (lo-bal) efforts to generate relevant knowledge about cancer burden, pathogenesis, and therapeutic approaches using a bottom-up approach to sharpen the focus on local and global relevance of research and clinical and public practice, particularly in resource-limited countries. The section on Clinical Oncology in Infectious Agents and Cancer will harness these "lo-bal" strategies to reduce substantially the time from concept, discovery, and development and implementation of locally and globally applicable diagnostic and therapeutic technologies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number39
JournalInfectious Agents and Cancer
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Medical Oncology
Neoplasms
Mortality
Technology
Morbidity
Urbanization
Infection
Communicable Diseases
Life Style
Therapeutics
Public Health
Economics
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Oncology
  • Epidemiology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Buonaguro, F. M., Gueye, S. N., Wabinga, H. R., Ngoma, T. A., Vermorken, J. B., & Mbulaiteye, S. M. (2013). Clinical oncology in resource-limited settings. Infectious Agents and Cancer, 8(1), [39]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-9378-8-39

Clinical oncology in resource-limited settings. / Buonaguro, Franco M.; Gueye, Serigne N.; Wabinga, Henry R.; Ngoma, Twalib A.; Vermorken, Jan B.; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

In: Infectious Agents and Cancer, Vol. 8, No. 1, 39, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buonaguro, FM, Gueye, SN, Wabinga, HR, Ngoma, TA, Vermorken, JB & Mbulaiteye, SM 2013, 'Clinical oncology in resource-limited settings', Infectious Agents and Cancer, vol. 8, no. 1, 39. https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-9378-8-39
Buonaguro, Franco M. ; Gueye, Serigne N. ; Wabinga, Henry R. ; Ngoma, Twalib A. ; Vermorken, Jan B. ; Mbulaiteye, Sam M. / Clinical oncology in resource-limited settings. In: Infectious Agents and Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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