Clinical outcome in women with HER2-positive de novo or recurring stage IV breast cancer receiving trastuzumab-based therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Five to 10% of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer have synchronous metastases ( de novo stage IV). A further 20% will develop metastases during follow-up (recurring stage IV). We compared the clinical outcomes of women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line trastuzumab-based therapy according to type of metastatic presentation. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of 331 MBC patients receiving first-line trastuzumab-based treatment. Response rates (RR) were compared by the chi-square test. Time-to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) curves were compared by the log-rank test. Cox-proportional hazards models were used to study predictors of PFS and OS, including the type of metastatic presentation. Results: Seventy-seven patients (23%) had de novo stage IV disease. Forty-six of these patients underwent surgery of the primary (". de novo/surgery"). Response rates to first-line trastuzumab-based therapy and median progression-free survival did not differ in patients with "recurring", ". de novo/surgery" and ". de novo" without surgery (". de novo/no surgery) stage IV breast cancer. However, women with ". de novo/surgery" stage IV breast cancer had the longest median OS (60 months), and those with ". de novo/no surgery" stage IV breast cancer the shortest (26 months). For women with recurring metastatic breast cancer median OS was 40 months (overall log-rank test, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalBreast
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • De novo
  • HER2
  • Metastases
  • Recurring
  • Trastuzumab

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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