Clinical phenotypes and trajectories of disease progression in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy

Roberto De Sanctis, Marika Pane, Giorgia Coratti, Concetta Palermo, Daniela Leone, Maria Carmela Pera, Emanuela Abiusi, Stefania Fiori, Nicola Forcina, Lavinia Fanelli, Simona Lucibello, Elena S. Mazzone, Francesco Danilo Tiziano, Eugenio Mercuri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The advent of clinical trials has highlighted the need for natural history studies reporting disease progression in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. The aim of this study was to assess functional changes using the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test of Neuromuscular Disorders (CHOP INTEND) scale in a cohort of type 1 infants. Nutritional and respiratory longitudinal data were also recorded. Patients were classified according to the severity of the phenotype and age of onset. SMN2 copies were also assessed. Twenty patients were included, eight with early onset most severe phenotype, eight with the more typical type 1 phenotype and 4, who achieved some head control, with a milder phenotype. Both baseline values and trajectories of progression were different in the three subgroups (p = 0.0001). Infants with the most severe phenotype had the lowest scores (below 20) on their first assessment and had the most rapid decline. Those with the typical phenotype had scores generally between 20 and 40 and also had a fast decline. The infants with the milder phenotype had the highest scores, generally above 35, and a much slower deterioration. Infants with three SMN2 copies had an overall milder phenotype and milder progression while two SMN2 copies were found in all three subgroups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-28
Number of pages5
JournalNeuromuscular Disorders
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood
Disease Progression
Phenotype
Natural History
Age of Onset
Head
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test of Neuromuscular Disorders
  • Neuromuscular disorders
  • Outcome measures
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy
  • Werdnig-Hoffman disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Clinical phenotypes and trajectories of disease progression in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. / De Sanctis, Roberto; Pane, Marika; Coratti, Giorgia; Palermo, Concetta; Leone, Daniela; Pera, Maria Carmela; Abiusi, Emanuela; Fiori, Stefania; Forcina, Nicola; Fanelli, Lavinia; Lucibello, Simona; Mazzone, Elena S.; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Mercuri, Eugenio.

In: Neuromuscular Disorders, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 24-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Sanctis, R, Pane, M, Coratti, G, Palermo, C, Leone, D, Pera, MC, Abiusi, E, Fiori, S, Forcina, N, Fanelli, L, Lucibello, S, Mazzone, ES, Tiziano, FD & Mercuri, E 2018, 'Clinical phenotypes and trajectories of disease progression in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy', Neuromuscular Disorders, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 24-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nmd.2017.09.015
De Sanctis, Roberto ; Pane, Marika ; Coratti, Giorgia ; Palermo, Concetta ; Leone, Daniela ; Pera, Maria Carmela ; Abiusi, Emanuela ; Fiori, Stefania ; Forcina, Nicola ; Fanelli, Lavinia ; Lucibello, Simona ; Mazzone, Elena S. ; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo ; Mercuri, Eugenio. / Clinical phenotypes and trajectories of disease progression in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. In: Neuromuscular Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 24-28.
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