Clinical profile and prognostic value of anemia at the time of admission and discharge among patients hospitalized for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction findings from the EVEREST trial

Robert J. Mentz, Stephen J. Greene, Andrew P. Ambrosy, Muthiah Vaduganathan, Haris P. Subacius, Karl Swedberg, Aldo P. Maggioni, Savina Nodari, Piotr Ponikowski, Stefan D. Anker, Javed Butler, Mihai Gheorghiade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Anemia has been associated with worse outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and postdischarge outcomes of hospitalized HF patients with anemia at admission or discharge. Methods and Results: An analysis was performed on 3731 (90%) of 4133 hospitalized HF patients with ejection fraction ≤40% enrolled in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonist in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial with baseline hemoglobin data, comparing the clinical characteristics and outcomes (all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalization) of patients with and without anemia (hemoglobin 100 days) on adjusted analysis (both P>0.1). Conclusions: Among hospitalized HF patients with reduced ejection fraction, modest anemia at discharge but not baseline was associated with increased all-cause mortality and short-term cardiovascular mortality plus HF hospitalization. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00071331.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-408
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation: Heart Failure
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Anemia
  • Heart failure
  • Hemoglobin
  • Hospitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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