Clinical validity of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease in the context of a structured 5-phase development framework

Geneva Task Force for the Roadmap of Alzheimer's Biomarkers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The use of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers is supported in diagnostic criteria, but their maturity for clinical routine is still debated. Here, we evaluate brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET), a measure of cerebral glucose metabolism, as a biomarker to identify clinical and prodromal AD according to the framework suggested for biomarkers in oncology, using homogenous criteria with other biomarkers addressed in parallel reviews. FDG PET has fully achieved phase 1 (rational for use) and most of phase 2 (ability to discriminate AD subjects from healthy controls or other forms of dementia) aims. Phase 3 aims (early detection ability) are partly achieved. Phase 4 studies (routine use in prodromal patients) are ongoing, and only preliminary results can be extrapolated from retrospective observations. Phase 5 studies (quantify impact and costs) have not been performed. The results of this study show that specific efforts are needed to complete phase 3 evidence, in particular comparing and combining FDG PET with other biomarkers, and to properly design phase 4 prospective studies as a basis for phase 5 evaluations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-195
Number of pages13
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • 5-Phases
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Biomarker-based diagnosis
  • Biomarkers development
  • Early diagnosis
  • FDG PET

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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