Close relation between cirrhosis and gallstones: Cross-sectional and longitudinal survey

Dario Conte, Mirella Fraquelli, Fabio Fornari, Lucia Lodi, Paolo Bodini, Luigi Buscarini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Increased gallstone prevalence and incidence in cirrhosis have already been reported in different series, including a limited number of patients with cirrhosis. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of gallstones and related risk factors in a large series of patients with cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 1010 patients with cirrhosis related to alcohol abuse, chronic viral infection, or miscellaneous causes (42%, 48%, and 10%, respectively) in Child class A, B, or C (48%, 36%, and 16%, respectively). In the longitudinal study gallstone development was monitored ultrasonographically in 618 patients free of gallstones at enrollment. Results: The overall prevalence of gallstone(s) was 29.5% and increased significantly with age without differences according to sex or cause of cirrhosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only Child classes B and C were significantly related to a higher risk of gallstone (odds ratio, 1.63 for class C vs class A and 1.91 for class B vs class A; P = .001). During a mean ± SD follow-up of 50 months ± 9 months, 141 (22.8%) of 618 patients developed gallstone(s), with an estimated cumulative probability of 6.5%, 18.6%, 28.2%, and 40.9% at 2, 4, 6, and 8 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Child class (hazard ratio, 2.8 for class C vs class A and 1.8 for class B vs class A; P = .002 and P = .001, respectively) and high-body mass index (hazard ratio, 1.31; P = .04) carried a significantly greater risk of gallstone formation. Conclusion: Cirrhosis per se represents a major risk factor for gallstones whose prevalence and incidence were far higher than those reported in a general population from the same area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-52
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume159
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 11 1999

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Gallstones
Longitudinal Studies
Fibrosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Only Child
Incidence
Virus Diseases
Alcoholism
Body Mass Index
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Close relation between cirrhosis and gallstones : Cross-sectional and longitudinal survey. / Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella; Fornari, Fabio; Lodi, Lucia; Bodini, Paolo; Buscarini, Luigi.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 159, No. 1, 11.01.1999, p. 49-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conte, Dario ; Fraquelli, Mirella ; Fornari, Fabio ; Lodi, Lucia ; Bodini, Paolo ; Buscarini, Luigi. / Close relation between cirrhosis and gallstones : Cross-sectional and longitudinal survey. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 159, No. 1. pp. 49-52.
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abstract = "Background: Increased gallstone prevalence and incidence in cirrhosis have already been reported in different series, including a limited number of patients with cirrhosis. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of gallstones and related risk factors in a large series of patients with cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 1010 patients with cirrhosis related to alcohol abuse, chronic viral infection, or miscellaneous causes (42{\%}, 48{\%}, and 10{\%}, respectively) in Child class A, B, or C (48{\%}, 36{\%}, and 16{\%}, respectively). In the longitudinal study gallstone development was monitored ultrasonographically in 618 patients free of gallstones at enrollment. Results: The overall prevalence of gallstone(s) was 29.5{\%} and increased significantly with age without differences according to sex or cause of cirrhosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only Child classes B and C were significantly related to a higher risk of gallstone (odds ratio, 1.63 for class C vs class A and 1.91 for class B vs class A; P = .001). During a mean ± SD follow-up of 50 months ± 9 months, 141 (22.8{\%}) of 618 patients developed gallstone(s), with an estimated cumulative probability of 6.5{\%}, 18.6{\%}, 28.2{\%}, and 40.9{\%} at 2, 4, 6, and 8 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Child class (hazard ratio, 2.8 for class C vs class A and 1.8 for class B vs class A; P = .002 and P = .001, respectively) and high-body mass index (hazard ratio, 1.31; P = .04) carried a significantly greater risk of gallstone formation. Conclusion: Cirrhosis per se represents a major risk factor for gallstones whose prevalence and incidence were far higher than those reported in a general population from the same area.",
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N2 - Background: Increased gallstone prevalence and incidence in cirrhosis have already been reported in different series, including a limited number of patients with cirrhosis. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of gallstones and related risk factors in a large series of patients with cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 1010 patients with cirrhosis related to alcohol abuse, chronic viral infection, or miscellaneous causes (42%, 48%, and 10%, respectively) in Child class A, B, or C (48%, 36%, and 16%, respectively). In the longitudinal study gallstone development was monitored ultrasonographically in 618 patients free of gallstones at enrollment. Results: The overall prevalence of gallstone(s) was 29.5% and increased significantly with age without differences according to sex or cause of cirrhosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only Child classes B and C were significantly related to a higher risk of gallstone (odds ratio, 1.63 for class C vs class A and 1.91 for class B vs class A; P = .001). During a mean ± SD follow-up of 50 months ± 9 months, 141 (22.8%) of 618 patients developed gallstone(s), with an estimated cumulative probability of 6.5%, 18.6%, 28.2%, and 40.9% at 2, 4, 6, and 8 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Child class (hazard ratio, 2.8 for class C vs class A and 1.8 for class B vs class A; P = .002 and P = .001, respectively) and high-body mass index (hazard ratio, 1.31; P = .04) carried a significantly greater risk of gallstone formation. Conclusion: Cirrhosis per se represents a major risk factor for gallstones whose prevalence and incidence were far higher than those reported in a general population from the same area.

AB - Background: Increased gallstone prevalence and incidence in cirrhosis have already been reported in different series, including a limited number of patients with cirrhosis. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of gallstones and related risk factors in a large series of patients with cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 1010 patients with cirrhosis related to alcohol abuse, chronic viral infection, or miscellaneous causes (42%, 48%, and 10%, respectively) in Child class A, B, or C (48%, 36%, and 16%, respectively). In the longitudinal study gallstone development was monitored ultrasonographically in 618 patients free of gallstones at enrollment. Results: The overall prevalence of gallstone(s) was 29.5% and increased significantly with age without differences according to sex or cause of cirrhosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only Child classes B and C were significantly related to a higher risk of gallstone (odds ratio, 1.63 for class C vs class A and 1.91 for class B vs class A; P = .001). During a mean ± SD follow-up of 50 months ± 9 months, 141 (22.8%) of 618 patients developed gallstone(s), with an estimated cumulative probability of 6.5%, 18.6%, 28.2%, and 40.9% at 2, 4, 6, and 8 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Child class (hazard ratio, 2.8 for class C vs class A and 1.8 for class B vs class A; P = .002 and P = .001, respectively) and high-body mass index (hazard ratio, 1.31; P = .04) carried a significantly greater risk of gallstone formation. Conclusion: Cirrhosis per se represents a major risk factor for gallstones whose prevalence and incidence were far higher than those reported in a general population from the same area.

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