Clostridium difficile biofilm

Claudia Vuotto, Gianfranco Donelli, Anthony Buckley, Caroline Chilton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important healthcare-associated disease worldwide, mainly occurring after antimicrobial therapy. Antibiotics administered to treat a number of infections can promote C. difficile colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and, thus, CDI. A rise in multidrug resistant clinical isolates to multiple antibiotics and their reduced susceptibility to the most commonly used antibiotic molecules have made the treatment of CDI more complicated, allowing the persistence of C. difficile in the intestinal environment. Gut colonization and biofilm formation have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of C. difficile. In fact, biofilm growth is considered as a serious threat because of the related increase in bacterial resistance that makes antibiotic therapy often ineffective. However, although the involvement of the C. difficile biofilm in the pathogenesis and recurrence of CDI is attracting more and more interest, the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation of C. difficile as well as the role of biofilm in CDI have not been extensively described. Findings on C. difficile biofilm, possible implications in CDI pathogenesis and treatment, efficacy of currently available antibiotics in treating biofilm-forming C. difficile strains, and some antimicrobial alternatives under investigation will be discussed here.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages97-115
Number of pages19
Volume1050
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1050
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Clostridium
Clostridium difficile
Biofilms
Clostridium Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacterial Drug Resistance
Molecules
Gastrointestinal Tract

Keywords

  • Adhesion
  • Biofilm
  • Clostridium difficile
  • EPS matrix
  • Genetic factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Vuotto, C., Donelli, G., Buckley, A., & Chilton, C. (2018). Clostridium difficile biofilm. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 1050, pp. 97-115). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1050). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_7

Clostridium difficile biofilm. / Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Buckley, Anthony; Chilton, Caroline.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1050 Springer New York LLC, 2018. p. 97-115 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1050).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Vuotto, C, Donelli, G, Buckley, A & Chilton, C 2018, Clostridium difficile biofilm. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. vol. 1050, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1050, Springer New York LLC, pp. 97-115. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_7
Vuotto C, Donelli G, Buckley A, Chilton C. Clostridium difficile biofilm. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1050. Springer New York LLC. 2018. p. 97-115. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_7
Vuotto, Claudia ; Donelli, Gianfranco ; Buckley, Anthony ; Chilton, Caroline. / Clostridium difficile biofilm. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1050 Springer New York LLC, 2018. pp. 97-115 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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