Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections

Ilvars Silins, Rosa Maria Tedeschi, Ingegerd Kallings, Joakim Dillner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Serology for different sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is useful for epidemiologic studies on the spread of STIs in different populations. Studying whether seropositivities for different STIs cluster could be useful, both for development of improved serologic markers of sexual behavior in populations and for understanding how STIs may differ in terms of the dynamics of their spread. Goal: To evaluate the degree of clustering of different STIs in relation to sexual history. Study Design: An age- and sexual history-stratified subsample of 275 women from a survey of healthy Swedish women seeking contraceptive advice was tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, and 33; Chlamydia trachomatis; herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2); and human herpesvirus 8. Results: Significant clustering was observed only for HPV types 6 and 11; for HPV types 16, 18, and 33; and for C trachomatis and HSV-2. The serologic marker that correlated best with lifetime number of sex partners was HPV type 16 (odds ratio [OR], 10.2; 95% CI, 3.8-27.6). The combined serologic marker that correlated most highly with sexual history was joint positivity for HPV types 16 and 33 (OR, 25.5; 95% CI, 5.4-120.4). Conclusions: The degree of clustering between different STIs varies from nonexistent to strong, implying that different STIs commonly have very different transmission dynamics. Certain combinations of STI serologic tests may be useful in epidemiologic studies for predicting sexual behavior in groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-211
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume29
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Cluster Analysis
Human papillomavirus 16
Human papillomavirus 11
Human papillomavirus 6
Human Herpesvirus 2
Sexual Behavior
Epidemiologic Studies
Odds Ratio
Human papillomavirus 18
Human Herpesvirus 8
Chlamydia trachomatis
Serologic Tests
Serology
Contraceptive Agents
Population
Joints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Silins, I., Tedeschi, R. M., Kallings, I., & Dillner, J. (2002). Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 29(4), 207-211.

Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections. / Silins, Ilvars; Tedeschi, Rosa Maria; Kallings, Ingegerd; Dillner, Joakim.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2002, p. 207-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silins, I, Tedeschi, RM, Kallings, I & Dillner, J 2002, 'Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections', Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 207-211.
Silins I, Tedeschi RM, Kallings I, Dillner J. Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2002;29(4):207-211.
Silins, Ilvars ; Tedeschi, Rosa Maria ; Kallings, Ingegerd ; Dillner, Joakim. / Clustering of seropositivities for sexually transmitted infections. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2002 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 207-211.
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