Coffee and alcohol consumption and bladder cancer.

Claudio Pelucchi, Alessandra Tavani, Carlo La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epidemiological studies on coffee, alcohol and bladder cancer risk published up to 2007 were reviewed. Coffee drinkers have a moderately higher relative risk of bladder cancer compared to non-drinkers. The association may partly be due to residual confounding by smoking or dietary factors, but the interpretation remains open to discussion, although the absence of dose and duration-risk relations weighs against the presence of a causal association. Most studies of alcohol and bladder cancer found no association, with some studies finding a direct and other an inverse one. This again may be due to differential confounding effect of tobacco smoking--the major risk factor for bladder cancer--in various populations. Thus, epidemiological findings on the relation between alcohol drinking and bladder cancer exclude any meaningful association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalScandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Supplement
Issue number218
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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Coffee
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Alcohols
Epidemiologic Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Urology

Cite this

Coffee and alcohol consumption and bladder cancer. / Pelucchi, Claudio; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Supplement, No. 218, 09.2008, p. 37-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pelucchi, Claudio ; Tavani, Alessandra ; La Vecchia, Carlo. / Coffee and alcohol consumption and bladder cancer. In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Supplement. 2008 ; No. 218. pp. 37-44.
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