Coffee reduces risk for hepatocellular carcinoma: An updated meta-analysis

Francesca Bravi, Cristina Bosetti, Alessandra Tavani, Silvano Gallus, Carlo La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background & Aims: Coffee consumption has been suggested to reduce the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We performed a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to provide updated information on how coffee drinking affects HCC risk. Methods: We performed a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the original articles published in English from 1966 through September 2012, on case-control or cohort studies that associated coffee consumption with liver cancer or HCC. We calculated the summary relative risk (RR) for any, low, and high consumption of coffee vs no consumption. The cut-off point for low vs high consumption was set to 3 cups per day in 9 studies and 1 cup per day in 5studies. Results: The summary RR for any coffee consumption vs no consumption was 0.60 from 16 studies, comprising a total of 3153 HCC cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.71); the RRs were0.56 from 8 case-control studies (95% CI, 0.42-0.75) and 0.64 from 8 cohort studies (95% CI, 0.52-0.78). Compared with no coffee consumption, the summary RR was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.84) for low consumption and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.39-0.50) for high consumption. The summary RR was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77-0.84) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee per day. The inverse relationship between coffee and HCC risk was consistent regardless of the subjects' sex, alcohol drinking, or history of hepatitis or liver disease. Conclusions: From this meta-analysis, the risk of HCC is reduced by 40% for any coffee consumption vs no consumption. The inverse association might partly or largely exist because patients with liver and digestive diseases reduce their coffee intake. However, coffee has been shown to affect liver enzymes and development of cirrhosis, and therefore could protect against liver carcinogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1413-1421
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Coffee
Meta-Analysis
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Confidence Intervals
Case-Control Studies
Liver Diseases
Cohort Studies
Liver
Liver Neoplasms
PubMed
MEDLINE
Alcohol Drinking
Hepatitis
Drinking
Epidemiologic Studies
Carcinogenesis
Fibrosis

Keywords

  • Caffeine
  • Chemoprevention
  • Epidemiology
  • Neoplasm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

Coffee reduces risk for hepatocellular carcinoma : An updated meta-analysis. / Bravi, Francesca; Bosetti, Cristina; Tavani, Alessandra; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 11, No. 11, 11.2013, p. 1413-1421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bravi, Francesca ; Bosetti, Cristina ; Tavani, Alessandra ; Gallus, Silvano ; La Vecchia, Carlo. / Coffee reduces risk for hepatocellular carcinoma : An updated meta-analysis. In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2013 ; Vol. 11, No. 11. pp. 1413-1421.
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abstract = "Background & Aims: Coffee consumption has been suggested to reduce the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We performed a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to provide updated information on how coffee drinking affects HCC risk. Methods: We performed a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the original articles published in English from 1966 through September 2012, on case-control or cohort studies that associated coffee consumption with liver cancer or HCC. We calculated the summary relative risk (RR) for any, low, and high consumption of coffee vs no consumption. The cut-off point for low vs high consumption was set to 3 cups per day in 9 studies and 1 cup per day in 5studies. Results: The summary RR for any coffee consumption vs no consumption was 0.60 from 16 studies, comprising a total of 3153 HCC cases (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.71); the RRs were0.56 from 8 case-control studies (95{\%} CI, 0.42-0.75) and 0.64 from 8 cohort studies (95{\%} CI, 0.52-0.78). Compared with no coffee consumption, the summary RR was 0.72 (95{\%} CI, 0.61-0.84) for low consumption and 0.44 (95{\%} CI, 0.39-0.50) for high consumption. The summary RR was 0.80 (95{\%} CI, 0.77-0.84) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee per day. The inverse relationship between coffee and HCC risk was consistent regardless of the subjects' sex, alcohol drinking, or history of hepatitis or liver disease. Conclusions: From this meta-analysis, the risk of HCC is reduced by 40{\%} for any coffee consumption vs no consumption. The inverse association might partly or largely exist because patients with liver and digestive diseases reduce their coffee intake. However, coffee has been shown to affect liver enzymes and development of cirrhosis, and therefore could protect against liver carcinogenesis.",
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N2 - Background & Aims: Coffee consumption has been suggested to reduce the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We performed a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to provide updated information on how coffee drinking affects HCC risk. Methods: We performed a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the original articles published in English from 1966 through September 2012, on case-control or cohort studies that associated coffee consumption with liver cancer or HCC. We calculated the summary relative risk (RR) for any, low, and high consumption of coffee vs no consumption. The cut-off point for low vs high consumption was set to 3 cups per day in 9 studies and 1 cup per day in 5studies. Results: The summary RR for any coffee consumption vs no consumption was 0.60 from 16 studies, comprising a total of 3153 HCC cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.71); the RRs were0.56 from 8 case-control studies (95% CI, 0.42-0.75) and 0.64 from 8 cohort studies (95% CI, 0.52-0.78). Compared with no coffee consumption, the summary RR was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.84) for low consumption and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.39-0.50) for high consumption. The summary RR was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77-0.84) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee per day. The inverse relationship between coffee and HCC risk was consistent regardless of the subjects' sex, alcohol drinking, or history of hepatitis or liver disease. Conclusions: From this meta-analysis, the risk of HCC is reduced by 40% for any coffee consumption vs no consumption. The inverse association might partly or largely exist because patients with liver and digestive diseases reduce their coffee intake. However, coffee has been shown to affect liver enzymes and development of cirrhosis, and therefore could protect against liver carcinogenesis.

AB - Background & Aims: Coffee consumption has been suggested to reduce the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We performed a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to provide updated information on how coffee drinking affects HCC risk. Methods: We performed a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the original articles published in English from 1966 through September 2012, on case-control or cohort studies that associated coffee consumption with liver cancer or HCC. We calculated the summary relative risk (RR) for any, low, and high consumption of coffee vs no consumption. The cut-off point for low vs high consumption was set to 3 cups per day in 9 studies and 1 cup per day in 5studies. Results: The summary RR for any coffee consumption vs no consumption was 0.60 from 16 studies, comprising a total of 3153 HCC cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.71); the RRs were0.56 from 8 case-control studies (95% CI, 0.42-0.75) and 0.64 from 8 cohort studies (95% CI, 0.52-0.78). Compared with no coffee consumption, the summary RR was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.84) for low consumption and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.39-0.50) for high consumption. The summary RR was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77-0.84) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee per day. The inverse relationship between coffee and HCC risk was consistent regardless of the subjects' sex, alcohol drinking, or history of hepatitis or liver disease. Conclusions: From this meta-analysis, the risk of HCC is reduced by 40% for any coffee consumption vs no consumption. The inverse association might partly or largely exist because patients with liver and digestive diseases reduce their coffee intake. However, coffee has been shown to affect liver enzymes and development of cirrhosis, and therefore could protect against liver carcinogenesis.

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