Cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review

Hamad Alzahrani, Annalena Venneri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Introduction Neuropsychiatric symptoms are one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). These symptoms have a negative impact on daily living activities and cognitive abilities. This review will be centred on published articles which focused on clarifying the cognitive and neuroanatomical features associated with the appearance of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms in this disease. Methods All articles indexed in the Web of Science and PubMed databases were reviewed for potential inclusion in October 2014. In the first stage of the review, we identified 41 articles that investigated neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairments in PD. In the second stage, there were 26 published articles on the neural bases of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Results The main findings revealed that executive dysfunctions were common in patients with depression, apathy, visual hallucinations (VH), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and anxiety, whereas, memory deficits were associated mainly with depression and VH. Imaging studies have shown that frontal lobe atrophy was frequently observed in patients with depression, apathy, VH and ICDs. Conclusion This review gives a snapshot of those cognitive and neural correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Methodological shortcoming in the available studies were identified, however, of which the most critical appeared neglecting the presence of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms in some of the patients included in studies of specific individual symptoms. Additionally, in most studies only patients in the moderate to severe stages were included which limits possible inferences to the early stage of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13866
Pages (from-to)32-44
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume356
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2015

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Hallucinations
Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders
Apathy
Depression
Aptitude
Memory Disorders
Frontal Lobe
Activities of Daily Living
PubMed
Atrophy
Anxiety
Databases

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Apathy
  • Cognition
  • Depression
  • Impulse control disorders
  • Neuroimaging
  • Psychosis
  • Visual hallucinations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease : A systematic review. / Alzahrani, Hamad; Venneri, Annalena.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 356, No. 1-2, 13866, 15.09.2015, p. 32-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4e8512c74e4548e181b3b0d7a19f4119,
title = "Cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review",
abstract = "Abstract Introduction Neuropsychiatric symptoms are one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). These symptoms have a negative impact on daily living activities and cognitive abilities. This review will be centred on published articles which focused on clarifying the cognitive and neuroanatomical features associated with the appearance of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms in this disease. Methods All articles indexed in the Web of Science and PubMed databases were reviewed for potential inclusion in October 2014. In the first stage of the review, we identified 41 articles that investigated neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairments in PD. In the second stage, there were 26 published articles on the neural bases of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Results The main findings revealed that executive dysfunctions were common in patients with depression, apathy, visual hallucinations (VH), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and anxiety, whereas, memory deficits were associated mainly with depression and VH. Imaging studies have shown that frontal lobe atrophy was frequently observed in patients with depression, apathy, VH and ICDs. Conclusion This review gives a snapshot of those cognitive and neural correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Methodological shortcoming in the available studies were identified, however, of which the most critical appeared neglecting the presence of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms in some of the patients included in studies of specific individual symptoms. Additionally, in most studies only patients in the moderate to severe stages were included which limits possible inferences to the early stage of the disease.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Apathy, Cognition, Depression, Impulse control disorders, Neuroimaging, Psychosis, Visual hallucinations",
author = "Hamad Alzahrani and Annalena Venneri",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jns.2015.06.037",
language = "English",
volume = "356",
pages = "32--44",
journal = "Journal of the Neurological Sciences",
issn = "0022-510X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Alzahrani, Hamad

AU - Venneri, Annalena

PY - 2015/9/15

Y1 - 2015/9/15

N2 - Abstract Introduction Neuropsychiatric symptoms are one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). These symptoms have a negative impact on daily living activities and cognitive abilities. This review will be centred on published articles which focused on clarifying the cognitive and neuroanatomical features associated with the appearance of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms in this disease. Methods All articles indexed in the Web of Science and PubMed databases were reviewed for potential inclusion in October 2014. In the first stage of the review, we identified 41 articles that investigated neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairments in PD. In the second stage, there were 26 published articles on the neural bases of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Results The main findings revealed that executive dysfunctions were common in patients with depression, apathy, visual hallucinations (VH), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and anxiety, whereas, memory deficits were associated mainly with depression and VH. Imaging studies have shown that frontal lobe atrophy was frequently observed in patients with depression, apathy, VH and ICDs. Conclusion This review gives a snapshot of those cognitive and neural correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Methodological shortcoming in the available studies were identified, however, of which the most critical appeared neglecting the presence of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms in some of the patients included in studies of specific individual symptoms. Additionally, in most studies only patients in the moderate to severe stages were included which limits possible inferences to the early stage of the disease.

AB - Abstract Introduction Neuropsychiatric symptoms are one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). These symptoms have a negative impact on daily living activities and cognitive abilities. This review will be centred on published articles which focused on clarifying the cognitive and neuroanatomical features associated with the appearance of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms in this disease. Methods All articles indexed in the Web of Science and PubMed databases were reviewed for potential inclusion in October 2014. In the first stage of the review, we identified 41 articles that investigated neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairments in PD. In the second stage, there were 26 published articles on the neural bases of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Results The main findings revealed that executive dysfunctions were common in patients with depression, apathy, visual hallucinations (VH), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and anxiety, whereas, memory deficits were associated mainly with depression and VH. Imaging studies have shown that frontal lobe atrophy was frequently observed in patients with depression, apathy, VH and ICDs. Conclusion This review gives a snapshot of those cognitive and neural correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. Methodological shortcoming in the available studies were identified, however, of which the most critical appeared neglecting the presence of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms in some of the patients included in studies of specific individual symptoms. Additionally, in most studies only patients in the moderate to severe stages were included which limits possible inferences to the early stage of the disease.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Apathy

KW - Cognition

KW - Depression

KW - Impulse control disorders

KW - Neuroimaging

KW - Psychosis

KW - Visual hallucinations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939254691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939254691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jns.2015.06.037

DO - 10.1016/j.jns.2015.06.037

M3 - Article

C2 - 26123201

AN - SCOPUS:84939254691

VL - 356

SP - 32

EP - 44

JO - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

JF - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

SN - 0022-510X

IS - 1-2

M1 - 13866

ER -