Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is associated to different patterns of gray matter atrophy according to clinical phenotype

Gianna Riccitelli, Maria A. Rocca, Elisabetta Pagani, Maria E. Rodegher, Paolo Rossi, Andrea Falini, Giancarlo Comi, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated to different patterns of gray matter (GM) atrophy and T2-visible lesion distribution according to the clinical phenotype. Experimental Design: Twenty-two relapsing remitting (RR), 29 secondary progressive (SP), and 22 primary progressive (PP) MS patients, and 39 healthy controls underwent high-field structural magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Voxel-wise distribution of GM damage and T2-lesions was compared between cognitively impaired (CI) and cognitively preserved (CP) patients according to their clinical phenotype. Principal Observations: Thirty-nine MS patients were CI. In all MS groups, regional GM loss was correlated with cognitive impairment. Different patterns of regional distribution of GM atrophy and T2-visible lesions were found between CI vs. CP MS patients, according to their clinical phenotype. No areas were significantly more atrophied in CI SPMS vs. CI RRMS patients. Conversely, compared with CI PPMS, CI SPMS patients had a significant GM loss in several regions of the fronto-temporal lobes, the left hypothalamus and thalami. While in RRMS and SPMS patients there was a correspondence between presence of T2 visible lesions and GM atrophy in several areas, this was not the case in PPMS patients. Conclusion: Distinct patterns of regional distribution of GM damage and T2-visible lesions are associated with cognitive impairment in MS patients with different clinical phenotypes. The correspondence between lesion formation and GM atrophy distribution varies in the different forms of MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1535-1543
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Atrophy
Phenotype
Cognitive Dysfunction
Gray Matter
Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Temporal Lobe
Thalamus
Hypothalamus
Research Design
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Clinical phenotypes
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Gray matter
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Regional
  • T2-lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anatomy
  • Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

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title = "Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is associated to different patterns of gray matter atrophy according to clinical phenotype",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate whether cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated to different patterns of gray matter (GM) atrophy and T2-visible lesion distribution according to the clinical phenotype. Experimental Design: Twenty-two relapsing remitting (RR), 29 secondary progressive (SP), and 22 primary progressive (PP) MS patients, and 39 healthy controls underwent high-field structural magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Voxel-wise distribution of GM damage and T2-lesions was compared between cognitively impaired (CI) and cognitively preserved (CP) patients according to their clinical phenotype. Principal Observations: Thirty-nine MS patients were CI. In all MS groups, regional GM loss was correlated with cognitive impairment. Different patterns of regional distribution of GM atrophy and T2-visible lesions were found between CI vs. CP MS patients, according to their clinical phenotype. No areas were significantly more atrophied in CI SPMS vs. CI RRMS patients. Conversely, compared with CI PPMS, CI SPMS patients had a significant GM loss in several regions of the fronto-temporal lobes, the left hypothalamus and thalami. While in RRMS and SPMS patients there was a correspondence between presence of T2 visible lesions and GM atrophy in several areas, this was not the case in PPMS patients. Conclusion: Distinct patterns of regional distribution of GM damage and T2-visible lesions are associated with cognitive impairment in MS patients with different clinical phenotypes. The correspondence between lesion formation and GM atrophy distribution varies in the different forms of MS.",
keywords = "Clinical phenotypes, Cognitive impairment, Gray matter, Multiple sclerosis, Regional, T2-lesions",
author = "Gianna Riccitelli and Rocca, {Maria A.} and Elisabetta Pagani and Rodegher, {Maria E.} and Paolo Rossi and Andrea Falini and Giancarlo Comi and Massimo Filippi",
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T1 - Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is associated to different patterns of gray matter atrophy according to clinical phenotype

AU - Riccitelli, Gianna

AU - Rocca, Maria A.

AU - Pagani, Elisabetta

AU - Rodegher, Maria E.

AU - Rossi, Paolo

AU - Falini, Andrea

AU - Comi, Giancarlo

AU - Filippi, Massimo

PY - 2011/10

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N2 - Objective: To investigate whether cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated to different patterns of gray matter (GM) atrophy and T2-visible lesion distribution according to the clinical phenotype. Experimental Design: Twenty-two relapsing remitting (RR), 29 secondary progressive (SP), and 22 primary progressive (PP) MS patients, and 39 healthy controls underwent high-field structural magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Voxel-wise distribution of GM damage and T2-lesions was compared between cognitively impaired (CI) and cognitively preserved (CP) patients according to their clinical phenotype. Principal Observations: Thirty-nine MS patients were CI. In all MS groups, regional GM loss was correlated with cognitive impairment. Different patterns of regional distribution of GM atrophy and T2-visible lesions were found between CI vs. CP MS patients, according to their clinical phenotype. No areas were significantly more atrophied in CI SPMS vs. CI RRMS patients. Conversely, compared with CI PPMS, CI SPMS patients had a significant GM loss in several regions of the fronto-temporal lobes, the left hypothalamus and thalami. While in RRMS and SPMS patients there was a correspondence between presence of T2 visible lesions and GM atrophy in several areas, this was not the case in PPMS patients. Conclusion: Distinct patterns of regional distribution of GM damage and T2-visible lesions are associated with cognitive impairment in MS patients with different clinical phenotypes. The correspondence between lesion formation and GM atrophy distribution varies in the different forms of MS.

AB - Objective: To investigate whether cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated to different patterns of gray matter (GM) atrophy and T2-visible lesion distribution according to the clinical phenotype. Experimental Design: Twenty-two relapsing remitting (RR), 29 secondary progressive (SP), and 22 primary progressive (PP) MS patients, and 39 healthy controls underwent high-field structural magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Voxel-wise distribution of GM damage and T2-lesions was compared between cognitively impaired (CI) and cognitively preserved (CP) patients according to their clinical phenotype. Principal Observations: Thirty-nine MS patients were CI. In all MS groups, regional GM loss was correlated with cognitive impairment. Different patterns of regional distribution of GM atrophy and T2-visible lesions were found between CI vs. CP MS patients, according to their clinical phenotype. No areas were significantly more atrophied in CI SPMS vs. CI RRMS patients. Conversely, compared with CI PPMS, CI SPMS patients had a significant GM loss in several regions of the fronto-temporal lobes, the left hypothalamus and thalami. While in RRMS and SPMS patients there was a correspondence between presence of T2 visible lesions and GM atrophy in several areas, this was not the case in PPMS patients. Conclusion: Distinct patterns of regional distribution of GM damage and T2-visible lesions are associated with cognitive impairment in MS patients with different clinical phenotypes. The correspondence between lesion formation and GM atrophy distribution varies in the different forms of MS.

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