Cognitive impairment in paediatric multiple sclerosis patients is not related to cortical lesions

Maria A. Rocca, Ermelinda De Meo, Maria P. Amato, Massimiliano Copetti, Lucia Moiola, Angelo Ghezzi, Pierangelo Veggiotti, Ruggero Capra, Agnese Fiorino, Lorena Pippolo, Maria C. Pera, Andrea Falini, Giancarlo Comi, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated the contribution of cortical lesions to cognitive impairment in 41 paediatric MS patients. Thirteen (32%) paediatric MS patients were considered as cognitively impaired. T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense white matter lesion volumes did not differ between cognitively impaired and cognitively preserved MS patients. Cortical lesions number, cortical lesions volume and grey matter volume did not differ between cognitively impaired and cognitively preserved patients, whereas white matter volume was significantly lower in cognitively impaired versus cognitively preserved MS patients (p=0.01). Contrary to adult MS, cortical lesions do not seem to contribute to cognitive impairment in paediatric MS patients, which is likely driven by white matter damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)956-959
Number of pages4
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 6 2015

Keywords

  • cortical lesions
  • double inversion recovery
  • grey matter
  • MRI
  • Paediatric multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognitive impairment in paediatric multiple sclerosis patients is not related to cortical lesions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this