Combination treatment with zidovudine, thymosin α1 and interferon-α in human immunodeficiency virus infectionand interferon-α in human immunodeficiency virus infection

Enrico Garaci, Giovanni Rocchi, Luigi Perroni, Cartesio D'Agostini, Fabrizio Soscia, Sandro Grelli, Antonio Mastino, Cartesio Favalli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of combination therapy with thymosin α1 and natural human lymphoblastoid interferon-α in human immunodeficiency virus infection and have shown that in vitro this combination treatment: (1) synergistically stimulated the cytotoxic activity against natural killer-sensitive target cells of lymphocytes collected from human immunodeficiency virus-infected donors and (2) did not interfere with the antiviral activity of zidovudine. We thus studied the effects of combination therapy with thymosin α1, interferon-α and zidovudine in patients with CD4+ lymphocytes ranging from 200 to 500/mm3 in a randomized non-blinded study and found that the treatment was well tolerated after 12 months of therapy and was associated with a substantial increase in the number and function of CD4+T cells. A similar effect was not observed in human immunodeficiency virus patients treated with zidovudine alone or associated with single agents. These data suggest the need for a controlled, double-blind clinical trial, recently initiated with the approval and the support of the Italian Ministry of Health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical & Laboratory Research
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1994

Keywords

  • Combination therapy
  • Human immunodeficiency virus infection
  • Interferon-α
  • Thymosin α
  • Zidovudine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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