Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation

B. Saracino, G. Arcangeli, A. Mecozzi, D. Tirindelli Danesi, E. Cruciani, P. Altavista, D. Giannarelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To test an innovative schedule of concurrent protracted intravenous infusion (PVI) of cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) with organ-sparing intent in bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two patients (pts) were selected to receive an aggressive TURB followed by 2 MCV cycles, and HFRT with concomitant CDDP and 5-FU PVI (33 pts) or HFRT and concomitant CDDP and 5-FU PVI (20 pts). The 5-FU and CDDP doses ranged from 180 to 220 mg/sm/day and from 4 to 6 mg/sm/day, respectively. Radiotherapy was delivered as three 100 cGy fraction per day or two 150 cGy fraction per day to a total dose of 50 Gy to the pelvis and a 20 Gy boost to the bladder. Results: Grade III toxicity in pts who received or not MCV was: rectal tenesmus 12/33 and 0/20, dysuria 6/33 and 4/20, leukopenia 3/33 and 0/20, thrombocytopenia 7/33 and 1/20 pts, respectively. A Grade IV toxicity was observed in 2 pts. Of the 28 evaluable patients treated with MCV, CR were observed in 23 (82%) and PR in 5 cases. Of the 18 evaluable patients treated without MCV, CR were observed in 18 cases (100%). Actually, 65% and 14% of the CR pts treated with or without HCV are alive and free of tumor. Conclusions: This bladder-sparing treatment shows an acceptable acute and late toxicity, similar to that observed with radiotherapy alone. The high CRs and bladder preservation rates observed deserve further clinical evaluation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-189
Number of pages7
JournalClinica Terapeutica
Volume149
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 1998

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Organ Preservation
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy
Fluorouracil
Intravenous Infusions
Urinary Bladder
Dysuria
Leukopenia
Pelvis
Thrombocytopenia
Cisplatin
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • 5-fluorouracil
  • Bladder cancer
  • Cisplatin
  • Hyperfractionated radiotherapy
  • Organ-sparing
  • Protracted infusion chemotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Saracino, B., Arcangeli, G., Mecozzi, A., Tirindelli Danesi, D., Cruciani, E., Altavista, P., & Giannarelli, D. (1998). Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation. Clinica Terapeutica, 149(3), 183-189.

Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation. / Saracino, B.; Arcangeli, G.; Mecozzi, A.; Tirindelli Danesi, D.; Cruciani, E.; Altavista, P.; Giannarelli, D.

In: Clinica Terapeutica, Vol. 149, No. 3, 05.1998, p. 183-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saracino, B, Arcangeli, G, Mecozzi, A, Tirindelli Danesi, D, Cruciani, E, Altavista, P & Giannarelli, D 1998, 'Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation', Clinica Terapeutica, vol. 149, no. 3, pp. 183-189.
Saracino B, Arcangeli G, Mecozzi A, Tirindelli Danesi D, Cruciani E, Altavista P et al. Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation. Clinica Terapeutica. 1998 May;149(3):183-189.
Saracino, B. ; Arcangeli, G. ; Mecozzi, A. ; Tirindelli Danesi, D. ; Cruciani, E. ; Altavista, P. ; Giannarelli, D. / Combined hyperfractionated radiotherapy and protracted infusion chemotherapy in bladder cancer for organ preservation. In: Clinica Terapeutica. 1998 ; Vol. 149, No. 3. pp. 183-189.
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AU - Altavista, P.

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