Combined use of music and virtual reality to support mental practice in stroke rehabilitation

Jonathan Trobia, Andrea Gaggioli, Alessandro Antonietti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mental practice consists of rehearsing a movement with the goal of improving performance. Recent clinical studies suggest that mental practice can be an effective way to facilitate motor recovery after stroke. Though healthy subjects can easily learn to visualize a movement mentally, brain-injured individuals may perceive this task as difficult and overwhelming. We report progress of a research project, which has investigated the feasibility of combining music and Virtual Reality (VR) to support stroke patients in performing mental practice. We tested this approach in two chronic stroke individuals. After four weeks of treatment, both patients showed improved motor function and reported reduced feelings of anxiety. The results of this pilot study are encouraging and deserve further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-61
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cyber Therapy and Rehabilitation
Volume4
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Music
Patient rehabilitation
Virtual reality
Stroke
Patient treatment
Brain
Research
Recovery
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Anxiety
Stroke Rehabilitation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Mental practice
  • Music
  • Neurorehabilitation
  • Stroke
  • Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Combined use of music and virtual reality to support mental practice in stroke rehabilitation. / Trobia, Jonathan; Gaggioli, Andrea; Antonietti, Alessandro.

In: Journal of Cyber Therapy and Rehabilitation, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2011, p. 57-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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