Combined use of the multidimensional prognostic index (MPI) and procalcitonin serum levels in predicting 1-month mortality risk in older patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP): a prospective study

Alberto Pilotto, Simone Dini, Julia Daragjati, Manuela Miolo, Monica Maria Mion, Andrea Fontana, Mario Lo Storto, Martina Zaninotto, Alberto Cella, Paolo Carraro, Filomena Addante, Massimiliano Copetti, Mario Plebani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Several scores and biomarkers, i.e., procalcitonin (PCT), were proposed to stratify the mortality risk in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Aim: Evaluating prognostic accuracy of PCT and Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-month mortality risk in older patients with CAP. Methods: At hospital admission and at discharge, patients were evaluated by a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to calculate MPI. Serum PCT was measured at admission and 1, 3, and 5 days after hospital admission. Results: 49 patients were enrolled. The overall 1-month mortality was 44.5 for 100-persons year. Mortality rates were higher with the increasing of MPI. In survived patients, MPI at discharge showed higher predictive accuracy than MPI at admission. Adding PCT levels to admission MPI prognostic accuracy for 1-month mortality significantly increased. Conclusion: In older patients with CAP, MPI significantly predicted 1 month mortality. PCT levels significantly improved the accuracy of MPI at admission in predicting 1-month mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Apr 17 2017

Keywords

  • Community-acquired pneumonia
  • Elderly
  • Procalcitonin, Multidimensional prognostic index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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