Comment on “Shiatsu as an Adjuvant Therapy for Depression in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease: A Pilot Study”

Giuseppe Lanza, Stella Silvia Centonze, Gera Destro, Veronica Vella, Maria Bellomo, Manuela Pennisi, Rita Bella, Domenico Ciavardelli

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Recently, there has been increasing interest toward nonpharmacological approaches for dementia and associated clinical manifestations, such as depression, with the common goal to improve health and quality of life of both patients and caregivers. In this scenario, the role of Shiatsu is of clinical and research interest, although to date a definitive recommendation on a systematic use in clinical practice cannot be made. To overcome the heterogeneity of the previous studies, we tested Shiatsu as an add-on treatment for late-life depression in a dedicated community of patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease. We found a significant adjuvant effect of Shiatsu for depression in these patients and hypothesized a neuroendocrine-mediated action on the neural circuits implicated in mood and affect regulation. However, this finding must be considered preliminary and requires confirmation in larger-scale controlled studies, possibly extending the range of outcome measures and including predictors of response. Future investigations should also include an objective assessment of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis functioning. Nevertheless, starting from this pilot study, we suggest that a customized protocol applied for an adequate period in a controlled sample will represent a non-invasive and feasible advance for promoting patients’ mood and, possibly, slowing cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 25 2019

Fingerprint

Acupressure
Alzheimer Disease
Depression
Therapeutics
Caregivers
Hypothalamus
Dementia
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health
Research

Keywords

  • alternative medicine
  • cognitive function
  • dementia
  • depression
  • health services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Comment on “Shiatsu as an Adjuvant Therapy for Depression in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease : A Pilot Study”. / Lanza, Giuseppe; Centonze, Stella Silvia; Destro, Gera; Vella, Veronica; Bellomo, Maria; Pennisi, Manuela; Bella, Rita; Ciavardelli, Domenico.

In: Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine, Vol. 24, 25.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Lanza, Giuseppe ; Centonze, Stella Silvia ; Destro, Gera ; Vella, Veronica ; Bellomo, Maria ; Pennisi, Manuela ; Bella, Rita ; Ciavardelli, Domenico. / Comment on “Shiatsu as an Adjuvant Therapy for Depression in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease : A Pilot Study”. In: Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 24.
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AU - Vella, Veronica

AU - Bellomo, Maria

AU - Pennisi, Manuela

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