Comparing 3-, 4- and 6-fields techniques for conformal irradiation of prostate and seminal vesicles using dose-volume histograms

Claudio Fiorino, Michele Reni, Giovanni Mauro Cattaneo, Angelo Bolognesi, Riccardo Calandrino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and purpose: Comparing some isocentric coplanar techniques for conformal irradiation of prostate and seminal vesicles. Materials and methods: Five conformal techniques have been considered: (A) a 3-fields technique with an antero-posterior (AP) field and two lateral (LAT-LAT) 30°wedged fields; (B) a 3-fields technique with an AP field and two oblique posterior (OBL) 15°wedged fields with relative weights of 0.8, 1 and 1, respectively; (C) a 4-fields technique (AP-PA and LAT-LAT); (D) a 6-fields technique (LAT-LAT and four OBL at gantry angles 45°, 135°, 235°and 315°) with all the fields having the same weight; (E) the same 6-fields technique with lateral fields double-weighted with respect to the oblique fields. The conformal plans have been simulated on 12 consecutive patients (stages B and C) by using our 3D treatment planning system (Cadplan 2.7). The contours of the rectum, the bladder and the left femoral head were outlined together with the clinical target volume (CTV) which included the prostate and the seminal vesicles. A margin of 10 mm was added to define the planning target volume (PTV) through automatic volume expansion. Then a 7 mm margin between the PTV and block edges was added to take the beam penumbra into account. Dose distributions were normalised to the isocentre and the reference dose was considered to be 95% of the isocentre dose. Dose-volume histograms and dose statistics of the rectum, the bladder and the left femoral head were collected for all plans. For the rectum and the bladder the mean dose (Dm) and the fraction of volume receiving a dose higher than the reference dose (V95) were compared. For the femoral head, the mean dose together with the fraction of volume receiving a dose higher than 50% (V50) were compared. Results: Differences among the techniques have been found for all three considered organs at risk. When considering the rectum, technique A is better than the others both when considering Dm and V95 (P = 0.002), while technique D is the worst when considering Dm (P <0.002) and is also worse than techniques A, E (P = 0.002) and C (P = 0.003) when considering V95. Technique E is the best when considering the bladder mean dose (P = 0.002 against A and D, P <0.01 against B and C) and technique C is the worst (P <0.012). No relevant differences were found for the bladder V95. In the femoral heads, techniques A and E are worse than B, C and D (P <0.003) when considering Dm and V50. Moreover, techniques B and D are better than C (P <0.004) when considering V50. Conclusions: There is no technique that is absolutely better than the others. Technique A gives the best sparing of the rectum; the bladder is better spared with technique E. These results are reached with a worse sparing of the femoral heads which should be carefully taken into account.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1997

Keywords

  • Conformal radiotherapy
  • Dose-volume histograms
  • Prostate cancer
  • Treatment planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Urology

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