Comparison between spectral analysis and the phenylephrine method for the assessment of baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure

Roberto Colombo, Giorgio Mazzuero, Gianluca Spinatonda, Paola Lanfranchi, Pantaleo Giannuzzi, Piotr Ponikowski, Andrew J S Coats, Giuseppe Minuco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Baroreflex sensitivity assessed by means of the phenylephrine test plays a prognostic role in patients with previous myocardial infarction, but the need for drug injection limits the use of this technique. Recently, several non-invasive methods based on spectral analysis of systolic arterial pressure and heart period have been proposed, but their agreement with the phenylephrine test has not been investigated in patients with heart failure. The two methods (phenylephrine test and spectral analysis) were compared in a group of 49 patients with chronic congestive heart failure both at rest and during controlled breathing. The linear correlation and the limits of agreement between the phenylephrine test slope and the α-index [α(c); corrected by the coherence function between the interbeat interval (RR interval) and systolic arterial pressure] were evaluated. Only 16 patients had a measurable α-index at rest in both the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) bands; the α(c)-index allowed measurements in all patients. It correlated moderately with the phenylephrine test slope at rest (r = 0.71 and P <0.001 in LF; r = 0.57 and P <0.001 in HF) and during controlled breathing (r = 0.51 and P <0.001 in LF; r = 0.63 and P <0.001 in HF). Multivariate regression analysis showed that only α(c)LF during rest and α(c)HF during controlled breathing contributed significantly to baroreflex gain estimation. However, the agreement between methods was weak; the normalized limits of agreement and bias were -162 to 243% (0.46 ms/mmHg) for α(c)LF and -185 to 151% (-0.99 ms/mmHg) for α(c)HF. Thus the comparison between baroreflex sensitivity measurements obtained by the phenylephrine test and spectral analysis showed a moderate correlation between the two methods; however, despite the linear association, a consistent lack of agreement between the two techniques was found. Because both systematic and random factors contribute to the difference, these two techniques cannot be considered as alternatives for the assessment of heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-513
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Science
Volume97
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Baroreflex
Phenylephrine
Heart Failure
Respiration
Arterial Pressure
Blood Pressure
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction
Regression Analysis
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity
  • Heart failure
  • Heart rate variability
  • Spectral analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Comparison between spectral analysis and the phenylephrine method for the assessment of baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. / Colombo, Roberto; Mazzuero, Giorgio; Spinatonda, Gianluca; Lanfranchi, Paola; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Ponikowski, Piotr; Coats, Andrew J S; Minuco, Giuseppe.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 97, No. 4, 1999, p. 503-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colombo, R, Mazzuero, G, Spinatonda, G, Lanfranchi, P, Giannuzzi, P, Ponikowski, P, Coats, AJS & Minuco, G 1999, 'Comparison between spectral analysis and the phenylephrine method for the assessment of baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure', Clinical Science, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 503-513. https://doi.org/10.1042/CS19990035
Colombo, Roberto ; Mazzuero, Giorgio ; Spinatonda, Gianluca ; Lanfranchi, Paola ; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo ; Ponikowski, Piotr ; Coats, Andrew J S ; Minuco, Giuseppe. / Comparison between spectral analysis and the phenylephrine method for the assessment of baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. In: Clinical Science. 1999 ; Vol. 97, No. 4. pp. 503-513.
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