Comparison of DNA adduct levels in nasal mucosa, lymphocytes and bronchial mucosa of cigarette smokers and interaction with metabolic gene polymorphisms

Marco Peluso, Monica Neri, Giovanni Margarino, Carlo Mereu, Armelle Munnia, Marcello Ceppi, Marina Buratti, Raffaella Felletti, Francesca Stea, Roberto Quaglia, Riccardo Puntoni, Emanuela Taioli, Seymour Garte, Stefano Bonassi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The recent introduction of biomarkers in population studies of lung cancer has improved the traditional epidemiological approach, especially in the detection of high risk groups. Many inhalable carcinogens form DNA adducts, an initial event in lung carcinogenesis, and therefore the identification of easily accessible sources of DNA for population studies is considered a leading priority in the field. In this study we compared the frequency of DNA adducts in samples from nasal brushing, bronchial biopsy and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in a group of 55 subjects, both smokers and non-smokers, undergoing bronchoscopy for diagnostic purposes. Polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes were also evaluated. The level of DNA adducts measured by 32P-labelling assay in nasal mucosa (108 relative adduct level, mean ± SD 1.10 ± 0.66) was higher than in bronchial mucosa (0.82 ± 0.36) and in PBL (0.54 ± 0.39, P <0.01). DNA adducts measured in nasal mucosa and in PBL were correlated with those in bronchial mucosa (P <0.01 and P <0.05, respectively). DNA adducts in smokers were significantly increased in both nasal mucosa and PBL, with a significant dose-response linear trend (P <0.05). No significant effect on DNA adduction of the genetic polymorphisms investigated was found. Nasal mucosa brushing proved to be a suitable procedure for the 32P-labelling assay and its use in population studies should be further explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2459-2465
Number of pages7
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

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