Complement-fixation test for rotavirus detection

comparison and analysis of different methods to reduce anti-complementary activity of some specimens

Paola Pauri, Patrizia Bagnarelli, Massimo Clementi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The complement-fixation test may be used to detect rotaviral antigens directly in clinical specimens. However, a certain number of specimens tested for human rotaviruses by the complementfixation test show an anti-complementary activity. By comparing eight techniques we analysed this anti-complementary activity and identified the best method for its reduction. Pretreatment of clarified supernatant of stool suspensions by some methods resulted in a reduction of anti-complementary activity, without reducing the sensitivity of the method. Clarified supernatants of 8 36 (22.2%) specimens were anti-complementary; this anti-complementary activity was best removed by absorption with fetal calf serum or calf albumin. Such treatment offers practical means of increasing the specificity of complement-fixation test. Some observations suggest that the anti-complementary activity of stool suspensions may be frequently due to the presence of one or more chelating agents that may be in faecal specimens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-335
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Virological Methods
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Complement Fixation Tests
Rotavirus
Suspensions
Chelating Agents
Albumins
Antigens
Serum

Keywords

  • anti-complementary activity
  • complement fixation test
  • rotavirus detection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

@article{22a453073ff14558be9fb752ca3f2af1,
title = "Complement-fixation test for rotavirus detection: comparison and analysis of different methods to reduce anti-complementary activity of some specimens",
abstract = "The complement-fixation test may be used to detect rotaviral antigens directly in clinical specimens. However, a certain number of specimens tested for human rotaviruses by the complementfixation test show an anti-complementary activity. By comparing eight techniques we analysed this anti-complementary activity and identified the best method for its reduction. Pretreatment of clarified supernatant of stool suspensions by some methods resulted in a reduction of anti-complementary activity, without reducing the sensitivity of the method. Clarified supernatants of 8 36 (22.2{\%}) specimens were anti-complementary; this anti-complementary activity was best removed by absorption with fetal calf serum or calf albumin. Such treatment offers practical means of increasing the specificity of complement-fixation test. Some observations suggest that the anti-complementary activity of stool suspensions may be frequently due to the presence of one or more chelating agents that may be in faecal specimens.",
keywords = "anti-complementary activity, complement fixation test, rotavirus detection",
author = "Paola Pauri and Patrizia Bagnarelli and Massimo Clementi",
year = "1982",
doi = "10.1016/0166-0934(82)90037-4",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "329--335",
journal = "Journal of Virological Methods",
issn = "0166-0934",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Complement-fixation test for rotavirus detection

T2 - comparison and analysis of different methods to reduce anti-complementary activity of some specimens

AU - Pauri, Paola

AU - Bagnarelli, Patrizia

AU - Clementi, Massimo

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - The complement-fixation test may be used to detect rotaviral antigens directly in clinical specimens. However, a certain number of specimens tested for human rotaviruses by the complementfixation test show an anti-complementary activity. By comparing eight techniques we analysed this anti-complementary activity and identified the best method for its reduction. Pretreatment of clarified supernatant of stool suspensions by some methods resulted in a reduction of anti-complementary activity, without reducing the sensitivity of the method. Clarified supernatants of 8 36 (22.2%) specimens were anti-complementary; this anti-complementary activity was best removed by absorption with fetal calf serum or calf albumin. Such treatment offers practical means of increasing the specificity of complement-fixation test. Some observations suggest that the anti-complementary activity of stool suspensions may be frequently due to the presence of one or more chelating agents that may be in faecal specimens.

AB - The complement-fixation test may be used to detect rotaviral antigens directly in clinical specimens. However, a certain number of specimens tested for human rotaviruses by the complementfixation test show an anti-complementary activity. By comparing eight techniques we analysed this anti-complementary activity and identified the best method for its reduction. Pretreatment of clarified supernatant of stool suspensions by some methods resulted in a reduction of anti-complementary activity, without reducing the sensitivity of the method. Clarified supernatants of 8 36 (22.2%) specimens were anti-complementary; this anti-complementary activity was best removed by absorption with fetal calf serum or calf albumin. Such treatment offers practical means of increasing the specificity of complement-fixation test. Some observations suggest that the anti-complementary activity of stool suspensions may be frequently due to the presence of one or more chelating agents that may be in faecal specimens.

KW - anti-complementary activity

KW - complement fixation test

KW - rotavirus detection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019832651&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019832651&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0166-0934(82)90037-4

DO - 10.1016/0166-0934(82)90037-4

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 329

EP - 335

JO - Journal of Virological Methods

JF - Journal of Virological Methods

SN - 0166-0934

IS - 6

ER -