Complete spontaneous regression of giant focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with hepatobiliary contrast media

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) of the liver is a benign lesion occurring in 0.6%-3% of the general population that probably reflects a local hyperplastic response of hepatocytes to a vascular abnormality. Most lesions are diagnosed incidentally and the natural history of the disease remains largely unknown. It has been shown that most FNH remain stable, or even regress, over a long follow-up period. We present a patient with FNH of the liver who was followed up for 7 years. A 26-yearold woman with a 5-year history of oral contraceptive use was referred to our hospital in February 2005 for further examination of a liver tumour. The diagnosis of FNH was made using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with hepatospecific contrast media; this technique allows a correct diagnosis, in particular distinguishing FNH from hepatic adenoma, avoiding an invasive procedure such as the lesion biopsy. After 7-year from the diagnosis, we observed the complete spontaneous regression of the lesion by enhanced MR scanning. In this patient, discontinuation of oral contraceptive use and two childbirths may have influenced the natural history of FNH. To our knowledge, in the English literature there is no report illustrating a complete regression of giant FNH but only studies of decreasing in size. The present case suggests that a young patient with giant FNH should be managed conservatively rather than by resection, because FNH has the potential for spontaneous regression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10461-10464
Number of pages4
JournalWorld Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume22
Issue number47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 21 2016

Keywords

  • Focal nodular hyperplasia
  • Magnetic resonance
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Pregnancy
  • Regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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