Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling

Stefano Porru, Sofia Pavanello, Angela Carta, Cecilia Arici, Claudio Simeone, Alberto Izzotti, Giuseppe Mastrangelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere94566
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 10 2014

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DNA adducts
DNA Adducts
Genetic Polymorphisms
case-control studies
Polymorphism
Occupations
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Lymphocytes
Case-Control Studies
genetic polymorphism
aromatic amines
Blood
lymphocytes
Amines
blood
Occupational risks
cumulative exposure
Coffee
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Feeding Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling. / Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 4, e94566, 10.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Porru, Stefano ; Pavanello, Sofia ; Carta, Angela ; Arici, Cecilia ; Simeone, Claudio ; Izzotti, Alberto ; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe. / Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.
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