Complications and surgical indications in 144 cases of nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

P. Ruggieri, R. De Cristofaro, P. Picci, G. Bacci, R. Biagini, R. Casadei, A. Ferraro, A. Ferruzzi, N. Fabbri, A. Cazzola, M. Campanacci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

From September 1986 to December 1989, 144 patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities were treated with combined surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The disease-free survival was 79% for good responders (necrosis greater than 90%) and 72% for poor responders (necrosis less than 90%), and the local recurrence rate was low. Improvement in long-term prognosis and the increase of limb-sparing surgery determine a higher rate of immediate and late complications. Most of the complications were observed in limb-salvage procedures; 63% of these procedures presented one or more complications. In nine rotationplasties, there were four complications, and in 13 amputations no complications were observed. Therefore, 55% of patients were affected by surgical complications. Twenty-eight complications were considered minor (not requiring surgery), whereas 77 complications were major. Functional results, evaluated according to Enneking's new system, were higher than 50% in two thirds of the limb-salvage procedures. Complications in limb-salvage procedures are more influenced by the type of reconstruction than by the surgical procedure used. Probably the most troublesome consequence of surgical complications in osteosarcoma is the deviation or delay in administering postoperative chemotherapy, which jeopardizes survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)226-238
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number295
Publication statusPublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

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