Complications linked to chronic peritoneal dialysis in children after kidney transplantation: Experience of the Italian registry of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis

Barbara Andreetta, Enrico Verrina, Palma Sorino, Alberto Edefonti, Francesco Perfumo, Sergio Bassi, Luciana Ghio, Donatella Cattarelli, Rosanna Coppo, Stefano Rinaldi, Giovanni Capasso, Giovanni F. Zanon, Graziella Zacchello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Our objective was to evaluate the infectious complications of the post-transplant period attributable to the persistence of catheter and other complications when chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) was performed post-transplantation. The design was a retrospective study, and the setting was an Italian registry of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis. There were 86 pediatric renal transplants (9/86 from living related donors, 2/86 simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation for oxalosis). Six of 86 transplants were lost at follow-up. Mean age of the children (n = 80) at transplantation was 9.3 years (range: 1.7-21 years). They had been on CPD for a mean period of 1.7 years (range: 0.2-4.6 years). During CPD, 67 peritonitis episodes (80% related to exit-site and/or tunnel infections) were observed, with an incidence of peritonitis of one episode per 16 months CPD. The mean safe interval of peritonitis and/or exit-site or tunnel infection was 208 days (range: 36-1897 days). The mean time of catheter removal was 80.3 days (range: 0-216 days) post-transplantation. During the first month post-transplantation, one episode of peritonitis secondary to a sepsis occurred in one child. No other episodes of peritonitis or exit-site and/or tunnel infections were observed. Two of 80 children returned to CPD (at four and at 12 months, respectively) because of persistent allograft failure. Furthermore, 12 patients were on CPD because of temporary graft failure. In all these patients the pretransplant peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter was utilized, with no complications. These data show that the persistence of the PD catheter after kidney transplantation has produced no infections or other complications. What is more, the catheter was safely utilized during acute rejection or primary allograft nonfunction.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPeritoneal Dialysis International
Volume16
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Children
  • Complications
  • Kidney transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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