Conditioning transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation induces delayed gating effects on cortical response: A magnetoencephalographic study

K. Torquati, R. Franciotti, S. Della Penna, C. Babiloni, P. M. Rossini, G. L. Romani, V. Pizzella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to investigate after-effects of 7 Hz non-painful prolonged stimulation of the median nerve on somatosensory-evoked fields (SEFs). The working hypothesis that conditioning peripheral stimulations might produce delayed interfering ("gating") effects on the response of somatosensory cortex to test stimuli was evaluated. In the control condition, electrical thumb stimulation induced SEFs in ten subjects. In the experimental protocol, a conditioning median nerve stimulation at wrist preceded 6 electrical thumb stimulations. Equivalent current dipoles fitting SEFs modeled responses of contralateral primary area (SI) and bilateral secondary somatosensory areas (SII) following control and experimental conditions. Compared to the control condition, conditioning stimulation induced no amplitude modulation of SI response at the initial stimulus-related peak (20 ms). In contrast, later response from SI (35 ms) and response from SII were significantly weakened in amplitude. Gradual but fast recovery towards control amplitude levels was observed for the response from SI-P35, while a slightly slower cycle was featured from SII. These findings point to a delayed "gating" effect on the synchronization of somatosensory cortex after peripheral conditioning stimulations. This effect was found to be more lasting in SII area, as a possible reflection of its integrative role in sensory processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1578-1585
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroImage
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2007

Keywords

  • Gating
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • SEF
  • Somatosensory cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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