Contemporary Incidence and Mortality Rates in Patients With Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer

C Palumbo, FA Mistretta, E Mazzone, S Knipper, Z Tian, P Perrotte, A Antonelli, F Montorsi, SF Shariat, F Saad, C Simeone, A Briganti, JB Lattouf, PI Karakiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: We comprehensively tested contemporary incidence and mortality rates in patients with germ cell tumor of the testis (GCTT). Materials and Methods: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (2004-2015), statistical analyses included estimated annual percentage changes, multivariable logistic regression (MLR) models, Kaplan–Meier curves, and multivariable Cox regression (MCR) models. Results: Of 13,114 GCTT patients, 7954 (60.6%) harbored seminoma germ cell tumors of the testis (SGCTT) and 5160 (39.4%) non-SGCTT (NSGCTT). Relative to SGCTT, NSGCTT patients harbored more advanced stage (for stage III 824 [16.0%] vs. 279 patients [3.5%]; P <.001). In MLR, higher rates of stage II/III affected those with never-married status (odds ratio [OR], 1.6; P <.001) and African American ethnicity (OR, 1.5; P = .005) for SGCTT and never-married (OR, 1.3; P = .002) and Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 1.3; P <.001) for NSGCTT. Significant differences in 5-year cancer-specific mortality (CSM) distinguished SGCTT (stage I: 0.4; stage II: 3.4; stage III: 11.4%; P <.001) from NSGCTT (stage I: 1.6; stage II: 2.5; stage III: 22.2%; P <.001). In MCR, unmarried status independently predicted higher CSM for SGCTT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .007) and NSGCTT (HR, 1.9; P <.001). Conclusion: Stage I and stage III NSGCTT survival is worse, than for SGCTT. Never-married, Hispanic, and African American individuals are at higher risk of more advanced stage and/or CSM in SGCTT and NSGCTT. We comprehensively investigated rates, temporal trends, and survival outcomes of germ cell tumors, within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (2004-2015). Seminoma germ cell tumor of the testis (SGCTT) rates increased over time. Stage I and stage III non-SGCTT (NSGCTT) survival was worse, than for SGCTT. Never-married, Hispanic, and African American individuals were at higher risk of more advanced stage and/or cancer-specific mortality in SGCTT and NSGCTT. © 2019 Elsevier Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1026-e1035
JournalClinical Genitourinary Cancer
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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    Palumbo, C., Mistretta, FA., Mazzone, E., Knipper, S., Tian, Z., Perrotte, P., Antonelli, A., Montorsi, F., Shariat, SF., Saad, F., Simeone, C., Briganti, A., Lattouf, JB., & Karakiewicz, PI. (2019). Contemporary Incidence and Mortality Rates in Patients With Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer. Clinical Genitourinary Cancer, 17(5), e1026-e1035. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2019.06.003