Continuous antihistamine treatment controls allergic inflammation and reduces respiratory morbidity in children with mite allergy

G. Ciprandi, M. Tosca, V. Ricca, G. Passalacqua, G. W. Canonica, M. Landi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Allergic reaction is characterized by a complex inflammatory process. Some of the new antihistamines have antiallergic effects and can affect the inflammatory cell recruitment via adhesion molecule downregulation. We aimed to assess in a 12-month study whether continuous treatment with an antihistamine (terrenadine) can reduce respiratory symptoms and local inflammation in children with mite allergy. Methods: The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled: it involved two parallel groups of children suffering from rhinoconjunctivitis and/or mild intermittent asthma due to mite allergy. They received either terfenadine (1 mg/kg per body weight per day) or placebo for 1 year. Nasal, conjunctival, and bronchial symptoms were recorded by diary cards; at each of the programmed control visits, a nasal scraping for inflammatory cells and ICAM-1 was performed. Some additional clinical parameters were also recorded: days of school absence, extra visits for acute respiratory symptoms, and days of hospital admission. Results: Only children treated with terfenadine achieved significant control of symptoms (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-365
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Mites
Histamine Antagonists
Terfenadine
Hypersensitivity
Inflammation
Morbidity
Nose
Placebos
Anti-Allergic Agents
Only Child
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Double-Blind Method
Therapeutics
Down-Regulation
Asthma
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Adhesion molecules
  • Allergic inflammation
  • Antihistamines
  • Long-term treatment
  • Mite allergy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Continuous antihistamine treatment controls allergic inflammation and reduces respiratory morbidity in children with mite allergy. / Ciprandi, G.; Tosca, M.; Ricca, V.; Passalacqua, G.; Canonica, G. W.; Landi, M.

In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 1999, p. 358-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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