Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Versus Oxygen Therapy in the Cardiac Surgical Ward: A Randomized Trial

L Olper, E Bignami, Ambra Licia Di Prima, S Albini, S Nascimbene, L Cabrini, G Landoni, O Alfieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a common technique to manage patients with acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit. However, use of NIV in general wards is less well described. The authors’ aim was to demonstrate efficacy of NIV, applied in a cardiac surgery ward, in improving oxygenation in patients who developed hypoxemic acute respiratory failure after being discharged from the intensive care unit. Design Randomized, open-label trial. Setting University hospital. Participants Sixty-four patients with hypoxemia (PaO2/FIO2 ratio between 100 and 250) admitted to the main ward after cardiac surgery. Interventions Patients were randomized to receive standard treatment (oxygen, early mobilization, a program of breathing exercises and diuretics) or continuous positive airway pressure in addition to standard treatment. Continuous positive airway pressure was administered 3 times a day for 2 consecutive days. Every cycle lasted 1 to 3 hours. All patients completed their 1-year follow-up. Data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Measurements and Main Results The primary endpoint was the number of patients with PaO2/FIO2
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-121
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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