Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Assessment of Patients with Indeterminate Abdominal Findings at Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

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Abstract

Widespread use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) in cancer imaging may result in a number of indeterminate and false-positive findings. We investigated the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a second-level option after inconclusive PET. We reviewed CEUS images acquired over 4 y, selecting the examinations performed specifically to better assess an unclear PET image. Final diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy, surgery, further imaging or follow-up. Seventy CEUS examinations were performed after a PET scan (44 PET examinations, 19 PET-computer tomography [CT] examinations and 7 PET-CECT examinations). The target organ was the liver in 54 cases, spleen in 12, gallbladder in 2 and pancreas and kidney in one each. In 6 of 70 cases, CEUS was performed because of a negative PET (no uptake) despite an abnormal finding on the CT images of the PET-CT study; CEUS allowed a correct diagnosis in all of these. In 20 of 70 cases, the PET findings were categorized as indeterminate and non-specific (non-specific fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in PET report with no standardized uptake value given); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 19 of the 20 cases with one false negative. In 34 of 70 cases, PET was indeterminate, but specific (fluorodeoxyglucose uptake with a standardized uptake value provided); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 30 of these 34 cases. In 10 of 70 cases, PET was categorized as determinate but to be investigated because of discrepancy with clinical or imaging findings; CEUS a definitive diagnosis in 9 of 10 cases. CEUS proved to be effective option in the assessment of cancer patients with indeterminate PET findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2717-2723
Number of pages7
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume42
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Positron-Emission Tomography
positrons
tomography
examination
Tomography
cancer
pancreas
Gallbladder
spleen
kidneys
Pancreas
Neoplasms
liver
surgery
organs
Spleen

Keywords

  • Abdomen
  • Cancer
  • Contrast-enhanced sonography
  • Focal liver lesions
  • Positron emission tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Assessment of Patients with Indeterminate Abdominal Findings at Positron Emission Tomography Imaging",
abstract = "Widespread use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) in cancer imaging may result in a number of indeterminate and false-positive findings. We investigated the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a second-level option after inconclusive PET. We reviewed CEUS images acquired over 4 y, selecting the examinations performed specifically to better assess an unclear PET image. Final diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy, surgery, further imaging or follow-up. Seventy CEUS examinations were performed after a PET scan (44 PET examinations, 19 PET-computer tomography [CT] examinations and 7 PET-CECT examinations). The target organ was the liver in 54 cases, spleen in 12, gallbladder in 2 and pancreas and kidney in one each. In 6 of 70 cases, CEUS was performed because of a negative PET (no uptake) despite an abnormal finding on the CT images of the PET-CT study; CEUS allowed a correct diagnosis in all of these. In 20 of 70 cases, the PET findings were categorized as indeterminate and non-specific (non-specific fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in PET report with no standardized uptake value given); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 19 of the 20 cases with one false negative. In 34 of 70 cases, PET was indeterminate, but specific (fluorodeoxyglucose uptake with a standardized uptake value provided); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 30 of these 34 cases. In 10 of 70 cases, PET was categorized as determinate but to be investigated because of discrepancy with clinical or imaging findings; CEUS a definitive diagnosis in 9 of 10 cases. CEUS proved to be effective option in the assessment of cancer patients with indeterminate PET findings.",
keywords = "Abdomen, Cancer, Contrast-enhanced sonography, Focal liver lesions, Positron emission tomography",
author = "Orlando Catalano and Fabio Sandomenico and Paolo Vallone and Setola, {Sergio Venanzio} and Vincenza Granata and Roberta Fusco and Secondo Lastoria and Luigi Mansi and Antonella Petrillo",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Assessment of Patients with Indeterminate Abdominal Findings at Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

AU - Catalano, Orlando

AU - Sandomenico, Fabio

AU - Vallone, Paolo

AU - Setola, Sergio Venanzio

AU - Granata, Vincenza

AU - Fusco, Roberta

AU - Lastoria, Secondo

AU - Mansi, Luigi

AU - Petrillo, Antonella

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Widespread use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) in cancer imaging may result in a number of indeterminate and false-positive findings. We investigated the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a second-level option after inconclusive PET. We reviewed CEUS images acquired over 4 y, selecting the examinations performed specifically to better assess an unclear PET image. Final diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy, surgery, further imaging or follow-up. Seventy CEUS examinations were performed after a PET scan (44 PET examinations, 19 PET-computer tomography [CT] examinations and 7 PET-CECT examinations). The target organ was the liver in 54 cases, spleen in 12, gallbladder in 2 and pancreas and kidney in one each. In 6 of 70 cases, CEUS was performed because of a negative PET (no uptake) despite an abnormal finding on the CT images of the PET-CT study; CEUS allowed a correct diagnosis in all of these. In 20 of 70 cases, the PET findings were categorized as indeterminate and non-specific (non-specific fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in PET report with no standardized uptake value given); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 19 of the 20 cases with one false negative. In 34 of 70 cases, PET was indeterminate, but specific (fluorodeoxyglucose uptake with a standardized uptake value provided); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 30 of these 34 cases. In 10 of 70 cases, PET was categorized as determinate but to be investigated because of discrepancy with clinical or imaging findings; CEUS a definitive diagnosis in 9 of 10 cases. CEUS proved to be effective option in the assessment of cancer patients with indeterminate PET findings.

AB - Widespread use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) in cancer imaging may result in a number of indeterminate and false-positive findings. We investigated the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a second-level option after inconclusive PET. We reviewed CEUS images acquired over 4 y, selecting the examinations performed specifically to better assess an unclear PET image. Final diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy, surgery, further imaging or follow-up. Seventy CEUS examinations were performed after a PET scan (44 PET examinations, 19 PET-computer tomography [CT] examinations and 7 PET-CECT examinations). The target organ was the liver in 54 cases, spleen in 12, gallbladder in 2 and pancreas and kidney in one each. In 6 of 70 cases, CEUS was performed because of a negative PET (no uptake) despite an abnormal finding on the CT images of the PET-CT study; CEUS allowed a correct diagnosis in all of these. In 20 of 70 cases, the PET findings were categorized as indeterminate and non-specific (non-specific fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in PET report with no standardized uptake value given); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 19 of the 20 cases with one false negative. In 34 of 70 cases, PET was indeterminate, but specific (fluorodeoxyglucose uptake with a standardized uptake value provided); CEUS reached a correct diagnosis in 30 of these 34 cases. In 10 of 70 cases, PET was categorized as determinate but to be investigated because of discrepancy with clinical or imaging findings; CEUS a definitive diagnosis in 9 of 10 cases. CEUS proved to be effective option in the assessment of cancer patients with indeterminate PET findings.

KW - Abdomen

KW - Cancer

KW - Contrast-enhanced sonography

KW - Focal liver lesions

KW - Positron emission tomography

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